1992 American Forests Awards

American Forests, January-February 1993 | Go to article overview

1992 American Forests Awards


DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD

GIVEN FOR DISTINGUISHED PROFESSIONAL SERVICE IN FORESTRY AND OTHER ASPECTS OF RESOURCE CONSERVATION.

SIDNEY R. YATES

Sid Yates, a member of Congress from the Ninth Congressional District of Illinois, is presently serving his 21st term. He chairs the Interior Subcommittee of the Appropriations Committee, where he oversees the budgets of the Forest Service in addition to those of the Interior Department. He has long been a strong supporter of urban and community forestry programs.

WILLIAM B. GREELEY AWARD

GIVEN ANNUALLY T0 SOMEONE WHO HAS MADE MAJOR CONTRIBUTIONS TO FOREST CONSERVATION IN THE AREA OR REGION IN WHICH HE OR SHE LIVES AND WORKS.

MARY H. SIZEMORE

Mary is a native of Tallassee, Alabama, where she and her husband Bill have resided since 1949. She received her Juris Doctor degree from the University of Alabama. Her goal of serving as a juvenile court judge was sidetracked when she became immersed in timbersale contracts, land-line disputes, and later timber-tax law and environmental aspects of growing timber with Sizemore and Sizemore, Inc. She has authored articles in the Journal of Forestry and the Natural Resources Law Journal and has presented numerous papers at forestry meetings. She served two terms as a director of AMERICAN FORESTS.

WILLIAM R. SIZEMORE

Bill is chairman of Sizemore & Sizemore, Inc., a consulting forestry firm that he founded in 1949. The firm specializes in forest analysis, appraisal, and management. He is a fellow in the Society of American Foresters and was elected to the Alabama Foresters Hall of Fame. He is an emeritus member and chairman of the Board of Visitors of the Duke School of the Environment. Presently he is adjunct professor of forestry at Duke University and Mississippi State University. He has been a member of AMERICAN FORESTS for most of his career.

JOHN ASTON WARDER MEDAL

NAMED FOR THE FOUNDER OF AMERICAN FORESTS, THIS MEDAL IS PRESENTED EACH YEAR TO A MEMBER FOR LONG-TERM ACCOMPLISHMENTS THE CONSERVATION OF FOREST RESOURCES AND THE ENVIRONMENT WITH SPECIAL CONSIDERATION FOR SERVICE TO AMERICAN FORESTS.

THOMAS H. RIPLEY

Tom Ripley has held numerous research and administrative positions in forestry, wildlife biology, range, watershed, and recreation management with universities, state agencies, and the U.S. Forest Service. In the last-named agency he served 11 years, rising to position of chief of range and wildlife research. He joined the Tennessee Valley Authority in 1970 as director of the Division of Forestry, Fisheries and Wildlife Development. He was elected president of the American Forestry Association (now AMERICAN FORESTS) in 1981 and reelected in 1982. In 1983 he was named assistant commissioner and, later, deputy commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Conservation. He retired in 1990.

PRESIDENT'S AWARD

GIVEN AT THE DISCRETION OF THE PRESIDENT OF AMERICAN FORESTS TO INDIVIDUALS OR ORGANIZATIONS WHOSE PARTICIPATION IN AND SUPPORT OF OUR ACTIVITIES HAS BEEN EXEMPLARY.

HYDE H. MURRAY

Hyde Murray is assistant director for national affairs for the American Farm Bureau Federation. He served on the staff of the U.S. House of Representatives for 30 years. For 20 years he was counsel and minority staff director of the House Committee on Agriculture. Since 1990 he has been a member of the AMERICAN FORESTS board, where his contributions have been significant, particularly in the areas of revisions to the bylaws, and in the governance of legal matters.

URBAN FORESTRY MEDALS

ESTABLISHED IN 1982 TO RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING LEADERSHIP AND SERVICE IN THE ADVANCEMENT OF URBAN FORESTRY CONCEPTS. THREE MEDALS ARE GIVEN EACH YEAR--ONE TO A CITIZEN ACTIVIST, ONE TO AN URBAN FOREST PROFESSIONAL, AND ONE TO AN EDUCATOR OR RESEARCHER.

CITIZEN MEDAL

DONA S. CHAMBERS

As executive director of Trees for Houston, Dona Chambers has spearheaded a citizen movement that has had nationwide influence. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

1992 American Forests Awards
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.