The Fan: Cricketers Are the Most Beautifully Dressed Sportsmen. or So the Wife Says

By Davies, Hunter | New Statesman (1996), September 12, 2005 | Go to article overview

The Fan: Cricketers Are the Most Beautifully Dressed Sportsmen. or So the Wife Says


Davies, Hunter, New Statesman (1996)


Who are the loveliest of them all? My wife has no doubt whatsoever. She came into my room today, before I had a chance to switch off the cricket, because of course I hate cricket, not interested, game for nancies and poshos. I'd only been watching it for two hours, perhaps three--OK, the best part of the day, just because I couldn't find any footer.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"Oooh," she said, or sounds to that effect. "I do think cricketers are the world's best-dressed sportsmen."

Don't drool over me, pet. Get back in that kitchen and clean those pots.

First of all, she loves their long white trousers, so attractive, and their sleeveless cable-knit white pullies. Then when they put on their visors she imagines them as knights in armour, oooh, Ivy.

Racing drivers: she also likes their outfits, especially their white boiler suits, zipped up to the neck, like something out of Casualty. Skiers, in their jackets and skin-tight trousers, they look good, and of course jockeys have always worn pretty clothes, but overall, cricketers are the most beautifully dressed. That's her considered opinion.

I was rather insulted, especially because she said footballers are about the worst looking. "No sportsman should wear shorts." I happen to have been in shorts since May, and intend to carry on until October, when we return to London, even if it does snow.

The only shorts-wearing sportsmen she had a good word for were the New Zealand All Blacks. Wearing all black is in itself attractive, fashion-wise, but they also do fill their shirts and shorts so well, having, ahem, such excellent physiques.

That is sooo lookist, which we in football never worry about, otherwise Lee Bowyer, Paul Scholes and Shaun Wright-Phillips would never get in the dressing room, never mind on the pitch. Not exactly hunks, are they? It's one of the many reasons football is a world game. Anybody can play it.

When I look at footballers, dressed for football, I don't look at their bodies. I am looking at history, thinking of the long, proud traditions of the club colours they are carrying, of fans who have been shouting "Come on you Reds", or similar, for more than a hundred years now. …

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