IAEA Vote Seen Hurting India-Iran Ties; Analysts Say Gas Pipeline May Be at Risk

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 8, 2005 | Go to article overview

IAEA Vote Seen Hurting India-Iran Ties; Analysts Say Gas Pipeline May Be at Risk


Byline: Anupama Narayanswamy, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

South Asia analysts warn India of a backlash from Iran over India's controversial Sept. 24 vote with the United States referring Iran to the U.N. Security Council.

Analysts say that although New Delhi's decision stemmed from wanting to safeguard its civilian nuclear deal with Washington, it could lead to long-lasting acrimony with Iran, a country India depends on to meet its rising energy needs.

"It's difficult to think that the vote was not influenced in some measure by India's deal with the U.S.," said Lawrence Scheinman of the Center for Nonproliferation Studies in Washington.

Justifying what is seen as a diplomatic turnaround from India's nonaligned stand, and supporting the EU-led resolution, India's ambassador to the United States, Ronen Sen, was quoted in a Times of India article as saying: "Just for a moment, take geopolitics out of the equation. Oil and gas are finite resources. Nuclear energy is not.

"Cutting-edge research in nuclear sciences and nonconventional energy like fuel cells and bio-fuels is not taking place in Iran or Saudi Arabia," he added.

After years of mutual distrust, the United States and India reached an accord in July in which Washington agreed to help India's civilian nuclear program. This pact now needs to be ratified by Congress, and will take effect after ratification, analysts think.

The EU resolution that passed was a watered-down version of the one first proposed and Indian officials took credit for this.

Harm already done?

After the resolution was passed, Iran, which has signed the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), threatened full-fledged battle against the International Atomic Energy Agency by enriching uranium and not allowing short-notice inspections that are mandatory under the NPT.

India's Foreign Secretary Shyam Saran said at a press briefing in New Delhi on Sept. 26: " ... much of the effort that we made, the diplomatic effort that we made, was in fact on behalf of Iran."

But some analysts think the damage to Iran-India ties has already been done, putting plans for a multimillion-dollar gas pipeline between the two countries in jeopardy.

In June, Tehran and New Delhi signed a $22 billion liquefied natural gas contract under which India will buy 5 million tons of LNG per year for 25 years starting in 2010.

The planned pipeline, which will run through Pakistan, was seen as a portent of peace in the region.

Amid widespread speculation about this contract, the Iranian government is sending mixed signals. Its Foreign Ministry spokesman, Hamid Reza Asefi, said Sept. 27, that Tehran was surprised by India's action. He said India's vote "came as a great surprise to us," adding: "We will reconsider our economic cooperation with those countries that voted against us."

And in a quick turnaround, a day later Iranian officials denied reports saying that India's vote at the IAEA would not affect the pipeline agreement with India.

Although analysts are not betting on the pipeline being built, they are reticent about this volatile issue, and some officials change their positions each day.

'Friends with everybody'

Stephen Cohen, senior fellow and analyst of India at the Brookings Institution, said: "Iran has announced that the pipeline deal will not go through, and once again, India is being tested at the old game of friends with everybody."

Another analyst George Perkovich, vice president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, said: "It makes economic sense that it will be done. But then, there is a lot of dependence on Pakistan, which is not a totally attractive deal for the Indians."

But according to Indian officials, the pipeline deal will still go through.

An Indian Embassy official in Washington said: "We see no connection between the proposed Iran-Pakistan-India gas pipeline and India's voting in an international forum. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

IAEA Vote Seen Hurting India-Iran Ties; Analysts Say Gas Pipeline May Be at Risk
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.