It Is Christians Who Are a Danger to Christianity

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), August 27, 2005 | Go to article overview

It Is Christians Who Are a Danger to Christianity


THE best way to approach The Da Vinci Code is with an empty head and a full bottle of vodka.

The more you drink, the more plausible the scenario becomes; and believe me you will need to be completely out of your tree to make any sense at all of the last few chapters.

The book is unadulterated piffle; geographically, religiously and historically inaccurate, and with so many holes in the plot it becomes the literary equivalent of gorgonzola cheese.

Yet for all of its faults it has become a publishing phenomenon, with sales approaching thirty-million and a total readership of around one hundred million.

The film version, starring Tom Hanks and due for release next summer, is expected to become one of the most successful ever made.

But why would so many people want to read a book which debunks two thousand years of Christianity and claims that most Church teaching is based on a lie?

It is worth noting, in passing, that had the book been about the Prophet Mohammed, and concluded that Islam was a fraud, then Dan Brown would either be dead or living in permanent fear of death from a host of Islamic fundamentalists. There would be a fatwah on his head.

Needless to say, there would be no talk of a film.

Actually, let&s be totally honest; following the fallout from Salman Rushdie&s Satanic Verses, Brown would never even have got a publisher had he chosen any religion other than Christianity.

Which must say something about the state of Christianity.

Indeed, the very fact that Lincoln Cathedral has accepted pounds 100,000 to allow the film-makers access, because Westminster Abbey refused them, itself says something about the state of Christianity.

The Westminster authorities based their refusal on the grounds that ...we cannot commend or endorse the contentious and wayward religious and historic suggestions made in the book.$

Unlike the Very Reverend Alec Knight, the Dean of Lincoln, who justified pocketing the dosh with the argument, ...yes the book is a load of old tosh, but it will bring Lincoln and Lincolnshire more into focus. It is a huge opportunity in secular terms.$

The Dean has missed the point. Dan Brown hasn&t simply taken a secular approach.

He writes from the perspective of the historian, prefacing the book with the words: All descriptions of artwork, architecture, documents and secret rituals in this novel are accurate.$

The Da Vinci Code says that the Gospels themselves are fraudulent.

It sets out to tear down the fabric of faith and accuses the clergy of propagating a lie down the centuries. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

It Is Christians Who Are a Danger to Christianity
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.