Platform - Treasuring the Lallans Language

The News Letter (Belfast, Northern Ireland), September 27, 2005 | Go to article overview

Platform - Treasuring the Lallans Language


ON 10 March, 1999, Marjorie Mowlam, one of Her Majesty&s Principal Secretaries of State, made Order 1999 No 859 on North/South Co-operation (Implementation Bodies).

The functions of the language body in relation to Ullans and Ulster-Scots cultural issues would be exercised by an Ulster-Scots agency of the body. Ullans$ was to be understood as the variety of the Scots language traditionally found in parts of Northern Ireland and Donegal. Ulster-Scots cultural issues$ related to the cultural traditions of the part of the population of Northern Ireland and the border counties which was of Scottish ancestry and the influence of their cultural traditions on others, both within the island of Ireland and in the rest of the world. This was a very skilfully crafted document which allowed a distinction between the language, which is spoken by people of varying ancestries, and the cultural traditions, which are an amalgam of Ulster and Scottish traditions, both Highland and Lowland.

One of my favourite books is A Treasury of Irish Folklore$ edited by Padraic Colum, which I bought in New York in the early 70s, where one reads: In north-east Ulster where the country people speak ! or, until recently, spoke ! the Lallans or Lowlands Scots, there is a particular tradition. The examples from that tradition given here are few, not because there is not a great deal to select from, but because much of it blends with the lore of the rest of the country. To come on a couple of striking poems in Lallans is, for this editor, a particularly fortunate circumstance ! they do not come in the usual Irish publications. In reading Winter and To a Hedgehog$, the one by a schoolmaster and other by a weaver, one might be left with the impression that they derive from Burns. This would be wrong. They are phrased in their own idiom$, says John Hewitt, the idiom being a branch of the great Lallans tree which still flourishes across the Moyle$. Written in Winter$ by James Orr and To a Hedgehog$ by Samuel Thompson were collected by my friend John Hewitt, in The Ulster Quarterly of Poetry Rann$, winter 1950. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Platform - Treasuring the Lallans Language
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.