Dirt Piles Boosting Building Heights; Activists Say Bill Misses Its Target

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 13, 2005 | Go to article overview

Dirt Piles Boosting Building Heights; Activists Say Bill Misses Its Target


Byline: Jon Ward, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Some Montgomery County developers have built houses too high by piling up mounds of dirt, building on top of the mounds, and then subtracting the height of the mounds from that of the houses.

A Montgomery County Council committee yesterday approved a bill that would end that practice, but community activists said the legislation would increase building heights and create a larger loophole for developers to build too high.

"This is really a change in methodology without dealing with the problem of excessively high buildings," said Carol Green, a Bethesda homeowner who has spent two years working to limit the height of redevelopment in neighborhoods.

The home next to Mrs. Green's was rebuilt on top of dirt piled up in the back and on both sides, creating serious runoff problems for Mrs. Green's property.

The full council will vote on the measure Tuesday.

Developers who attended the committee hearing in Rockville said yesterday that the measure would hurt homeowners who want to rebuild their houses and make them taller.

"A few developers artificially pushed up the grade, and they were wrong," said Mark Scott, owner of Mark IV Builders Inc. in Bethesda.

Mr. Scott said the problem has been fixed because the Department of Permitting Services (DPS) began in April to require measurements of existing grades before issuing building permits.

But DPS Director Robert Hubbard said Mr. Scott's explanation was "not anywhere close to reality."

DPS began in April to require builders to measure the height of "terraces," or the distance between the street and the first floor of a home, when they apply for a "terrace credit." DPS previously would take a builder's word on the terrace height, Mr. Hubbard said.

Terraces are not defined in zoning code as the natural landscape features, so builders could create artificial terraces and apply for a credit, which subtracted the terrace height from that of the building. …

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