Annual Luncheon Keynote Speaker

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Annual Luncheon Keynote Speaker


Ben Nighthorse Campbell

Tuesday, January 31, 2006

12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m.

Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center

Ben Nighthorse Campbell, former Republican U.S. Senator from Colorado, will be the keynote speaker at the American Correction Association's 2006 Winter Conference Annual Luncheon. Sen. Campbell's example of leadership and determination will serve as a model for Conference attendees striving to reach the pinnacle of their careers.

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Sen. Campbell was born on April 13, 1933 in Auburn, California to Mary Vierra, a Portuguese immigrant, and Albert Campbell, a Northern Cheyenne Indian. On November 3, 1992, he was elected to the U.S. Senate and was re-elected in 1998 with 62 percent of the vote. On November 3, 1998, he became the first Native American to chair the Indian Affairs Committee. He retired from the U.S. Senate at the end of his second term in January 2005.

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Prior to his election to the U.S. Senate, Sen. Campbell served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1987-1993), representing Colorado's Third Congressional District. Before that he served two terms in the Colorado General Assembly. Throughout his public service career he has sponsored legislation targeting issues that addressed Indian health, education and economic needs. During the 106th Congress, Sen. Campbell had more freestanding Senate legislation passed into law (12 public laws) than any other member of Congress.

Sen. Campbell played an important role in a controversy surrounding the name of the site of the battle of Little Bighorn, also known as Custer's Last Stand, maybe the best known example of the struggle between European settlers and Native Americans for control of North America. Emulating the exploits of Black Horse, his Cheyenne forefather, Sen. Campbell gave staunch opposition to anyone who challenged his beliefs on the subject. Because of his efforts, Congress changed the name of the site from Custer Battlefield National Monument to the Little Bighorn National Monument and authorized a memorial to the Native Americans who fought there as well.

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Through his support of a zero-tolerance for illegal drug use and the legislation he designed, Sen. Campbell secured funding in the fight against drug-trafficking through the creation of the Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA). The HIDTA program combines federal, state and local law enforcement agencies efforts to combat the manufacturing and the distribution of illegal drugs like methamphetamine.

ACA appreciates Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) for bringing Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell to Nashville!

As a child growing up, Sen. Campbell experienced many family hardships. His father was an alcoholic and would leave home for weeks and months at a time, eventually leaving the family for good. Sen. Campbell's mother had contracted tuberculosis when she was six and was often unable to care for her son, forcing him to spend much of his childhood in orphanages. …

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