Angels Are Really Up against It Now

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 16, 2005 | Go to article overview

Angels Are Really Up against It Now


Byline: Bill Melton

Former White Sox third baseman Bill Melton shares his analysis about Game 4:

Q. Was Saturday's game a dagger in the Angels?

A. I think it's going to be very tough for the Angels to win three in a row, that's for sure. But they're one of the few teams that can do it. The bottom line is they're just not playing very good and they're going to have to improve a heck of a lot if they want to get back in this thing.

Q. Do you worry about a letdown by the White Sox tonight?

A. They have to approach tonight's game like they approached Friday's game and Saturday's game. Ozzie Guillen is well aware of what happened in 2003 when the Marlins came in and beat the Cubs' two best pitchers. This thing isn't over until the last out is made. That's the attitude they have to take tonight.

Q. How about the job Freddy Garcia and the starters in general have done in this series?

A. These announcers on national TV are speechless, at least when they're done making excuses for the Angels. We're not getting a lot of hits, but the starting pitching has really picked us up. In Freddy's last start in Boston, he only went 5 innings and he looked like he was laboring out there. His stuff Saturday was much sharper - particularly his off-speed pitches. He was getting hitters left and right.

Q. What were the keys to Saturday's victory?

A. Paul Konerko has been carrying the team offensively, but then you look at guys like Carl Everett and Joe Crede - anyone can drive in runs at any time. …

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