The Effect of Individual Differences on Adolescents' Impulsive Buying Behavior

By Lin, Chien-Huang; Chuang, Shin-Chieh | Adolescence, Fall 2005 | Go to article overview

The Effect of Individual Differences on Adolescents' Impulsive Buying Behavior


Lin, Chien-Huang, Chuang, Shin-Chieh, Adolescence


INTRODUCTION

Impulsive buying behavior is a widely recognized phenomenon. It accounts for up to 80% of all purchases in certain product categories (Abrahams, 1997; Smith, 1996). It has been suggested that more purchases result from impulse than from planning (Sfiligoj, 1996). A 1997 study estimated that 4.2 billion annual sales volume was generated by impulse purchases of such items as candy and magazines (Hogelonsky, 1998). Retailers try to increase the number of impulse purchases through product displays and package design (Jones et al., 2003). In addition, contemporary marketing innovations, for example, 24-hour stores and television and Internet shopping, make impulse buying even easier (Kacen & Lee, 2002). Further, the growth of e-commerce and the increasing consumer orientation of many societies offer greater opportunities for impulse purchases.

Most of the research on impulse buying has focused on adults (e.g., Beatty & Ferrell, 1998) or college students (Rook & Fisher, 1995; Rook & Gardner, 1993). A few studies have focused on adolescents in spite of the fact that marketers have targeted adolescents in the belief that younger people have more disposable income (Simpson et al., 1998). Further, they are less likely to seek more information, comparison shop, or postpone purchases (Jones et al., 2003). Most young adolescents tend to be impulsive--doing and saying things on the spur of the moment without taking into account the risk involved (Kahn et al., 2002). In a time of dramatic psychological and physical change, there may be a wide range of impulsiveness based on age and emotional intelligence. Therefore, investigation of impulsive buying among adolescents with a range of personality traits would be a valuable addition to the literature.

Impulsive Buying Behavior

Impulsive buying behavior is seen as a sudden, spontaneous act which precludes thoughtful, consideration of all available information and choice alternatives (Bayley & Nancorrow, 1998; Rook 1987; Thompson, Locander, & Pollio, 1990; Weinberg & Gottwald, 1982). It is "an unplanned purchase" characterized by (1) "relatively rapid decision-making, and (2) a subjective bias in favor of immediate possession" (Rook & Gardner, 1993, p. 3). It is described as more arousing, unintended, less deliberate, and more irresistible than is planned buying behavior. Researchers agree that impulsive buying occurs when an individual makes an unintended, unreflective, and immediate purchase (Rook, 1987; Rook & Fisher, 1995; Rook & Hoch, 1985). Impulsive buyers are likely to be unreflective in their thinking, to be emotionally attracted to the object, and to desire immediate gratification (Hoch & Loewenstein, 1991; Thompson et al., 1990).

Researchers have found that many factors influence impulsive buying: the consumer's mood (Donovan, Rossiter, Marcooly, & Nesdale, 1994; Rook, 1987; Rook & Gardner, 1993; Weinberg & Gottwald, 1982), normative evaluation of the appropriateness of engaging in impulse buying (Rook & Fisher, 1995), self-identity (Dittmar et al., 1995), age, pocket money available, gender (e.g., Bellenger, Robertson & Hirschman, 1978; Wood, 1998), and cultural influences (Kacen & Lee, 2002).

With regard to age, based on a national sample of adults in the United States, Wood (1998) found an inverse relationship between age and impulse buying. Impulse buying increases slightly between the ages of 18 and 39 and subsequently declines. This finding is consistent with that of Bellenger et al. (1978) who found that shoppers under 35 were more prone to impulse buying than were those over 35. Since impulsiveness is linked to emotional arousal, older adults are more apt to control their emotional expression than are younger adults (Lawton, Kleban, Rajogopal, & Dean, 1992; McConatha et al., 1994). This would be reflected in older consumers' control of impulsive buying tendencies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Effect of Individual Differences on Adolescents' Impulsive Buying Behavior
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.