The Relationship between Medical Students' Cognitive Method of Thinking, Their Sex Their Academic Level and the Degree of Their Creative Thinking

By Qutami, Nayfeh | International Journal of Instructional Media, Summer 2005 | Go to article overview

The Relationship between Medical Students' Cognitive Method of Thinking, Their Sex Their Academic Level and the Degree of Their Creative Thinking


Qutami, Nayfeh, International Journal of Instructional Media


The Sample of the study consisted of all the students in the Faculty of Medicine. The study was conducted using 290 students. The performance of 279 students of the total were analyzed. 141 were males and 135 were females.

The results showed an influence in the interaction of different variables such as sex, academic level, and the cognitive thinking style in the Faculty of Medicine. Meanwhile, the results showed no difference in the three-factor-interaction in the students' cognitive thinking, in the Faculty of Medicine.

INTRODUCTION

Creative thinking includes generating new ideas or solving learning or daily life problems. It is also a method by which one tackles the issues, and the situations one comes across on a day to day basis. (Esquivel, 1995, P: 185). It is a mental process the results of which are made clear through a solution, a production or a discovery.

The literature of Psychology assumes that creativity is a variable process develops and grows under the influence of practice, experience and surrounding environmental elements (Treffinger, 1991, Renzuli, & Reis, 1991).

Creativity can also be developed through scholastic curricula used by students in various subjects when trained teachers with positive attitudes towards creativity are available.

Training and learning experiences provided by Ph.D. holders, in addition to the facilities provided by the university, can give the proper circumstances that contribute to the preparation of the proper environment in which students in general and students in the Medicine Faculty in particular can display their capacities. Consequently, students are motivated to raise their self-esteem and to obtain their motives of achievement that are related to their creative thinking displayed in practical and academic occasions.

Vernon (1989) hypothesizes that both male or female students, when they are exposed to their teachers' behavior, consider them to be role models. This can obviously be shown in the creative performance the students display. If such creative behavior is considered valuable to learning in social contexts, parents' and teachers' trends towards the male students' performance will not only develop, enhance and strengthen it, but will also keep it along the continuum. This can also be true as tar as females are concerned. But, due to the long period a female student waits before enrolling in a university, and due to her long exposure to the social raising techniques which limit her creativity, she is provided with less opportunities of getting the benefit of the activities and creative model experiences compared to male students.

Ignoring such facts may cause the female university students to be less courageous in displaying their creative performance because of being afraid of taking risks and because of looking for male adults satisfaction, especially within their own families.

Researchers in the field of learning and thinking model hypothesize (Butler, 1987, P: 12) that each individual has his/her own way of handling the issues and experiences s/he laces. Individuals also differ in their modalities that are considered channels to knowledge implemented in handling issues.

Developing such styles throughout one's childhood and adolescence makes them consistent and continuous features. Consequently, one's life is to be characterized by such styles (Gelade, 1995, P: 8).

A cognitive approach shows that the way an individual tackles his/her experience is controlled by three styles: some of them tackle their issues using their senses over time become their cognitive views; others use paintings and drawings of perceivable objects to represent their views intellectually and cognitively; a third group uses abstract symbols represented by numbers, thoughts, symbols and languages to present their experience. The latter tend to use the spoken or lingual experience in the form of symbols and sounds. …

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