Energy Efficiency Is Good for Business

The Journal (Newcastle, England), October 27, 2005 | Go to article overview

Energy Efficiency Is Good for Business


With the shorter days and colder weather encroaching, complaints are starting to be made about the office room temperatures.

However, with increasing energy costs and the Government's push for energy efficiency, npower business is advising its customers that resetting the business thermostat needs considerably more thought than previously given. Recent statistics from the Carbon Trust show that businesses are losing pounds 1.1bn annually on heating and cooling their energy inefficient buildings.

* With a little education on the financial benefits of energy efficient practices, npower suggests that there are simple and effective ways for businesses to reduce their overall energy consumption. The implementation of measures such as turning lights off at the end of the day or setting the thermostat one degree lower than normal could save companies as much as 20% on annual energy bills. Make sure employees are aware of the importance of energy efficiency. Tell all staff the results of energy saving measures introduced and how their actions are helping the company and the environment.

* Secondly, conduct an energy audit. npower business has developed an easy-to-complete, energy questionnaire which provides a clear view of how companies use energy and highlights areas for improvement.

* Turning lights off at the end of the day can cut energy costs by as much as 15%. Similarly, turning computers off at night and weekends can reduce energy consumption in offices by up to 75%.

* Use energy efficient lighting, they are 80% more energy efficient and can pay for their purchase cost within months.

* Forget the perception that spiralling energy costs are associated with the winter months, when thermostats are permanently pushed up to the limit and office lights are left blazing as the dark nights draw in. As temperatures rise in the spring, air-conditioning units become overworked and energy costs continue their climb.

* Finally, keep a close eye on energy consumption and review bills at least once a month ( if you can't measure it you can't manage it.

The release of the npower Business Energy Index revealed just how many

companies are experiencing increases in energy costs, and what this has meant to their performance.

Launched this year, the biannual npower Business Energy Index is intended to track attitudes of energy intensive SMEs and large firms on the issues of costs, energy efficiency and energy policy and regulation.

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