"Lifetime Fitness for Health" Course Assessment: Implications for Curriculum Improvement; Lifetime Fitness for Health Courses Can Have a Positive Influence on Students' Physical Activity Attitudes and Behavior

By Cardinal, Bradley J.; Cardinal, Marita K. et al. | JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, October 2005 | Go to article overview

"Lifetime Fitness for Health" Course Assessment: Implications for Curriculum Improvement; Lifetime Fitness for Health Courses Can Have a Positive Influence on Students' Physical Activity Attitudes and Behavior


Cardinal, Bradley J., Cardinal, Marita K., Burger, Molly E., JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance


Every other year, comprehensive school health education programs and policies are assessed nationally using the School Health Education Profile (SHEP) survey (Grunbaum et al., 1998). The data are collected in modules that are completed by different stakeholders within the school system (e.g., health and physical education teachers, nurses, principals). As part of a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Oregon has participated in the SHEP survey since 1996 (Dowler & Ehrlich, 2002). In addition to the questions required by the national report, supplemental questions are allowed at the state level within any given module. These are used to examine emerging trends or specific regional issues. Eleven supplemental questions designed to assess middle and high school level "Lifetime Fitness for Health" (also commonly called "Fitness for Life" or "Personal Fitness") courses were placed in the "Lead Physical Education Specialist Module" of the 2002 Oregon SHEP survey.

The specific aim of the questions was to determine the availability of such courses in Oregon, as well as to describe the breadth of material covered in these courses. The need for and importance of Lifetime Fitness for Health courses was regarded as an emerging trend since seven states and the Department of Defense Dependent Schools mandate such courses at the high school level (Masurier & Corbin, 2002), and the topics typically covered in these courses are included in national and state physical education content standards (National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2004; Oregon Department of Education, 2001).

Oregon is believed to be the first state to assess its middle and high school level Lifetime Fitness for Health courses within the SHEP survey. While the results of this study cannot be generalized to other states, this initial report may serve to stimulate similar research elsewhere. Also, as will be seen, the results, coupled with the findings of other studies, generated some curriculum and instruction issues that are important for physical educators beyond the state of Oregon to consider. It is hoped that this research will create a national dialogue regarding the importance of Lifetime Fitness for Health courses in the physical education curriculum, the developmental scope and sequence of content covered in these courses, and the need for a greater sharing of appropriate teaching practices regarding the instruction of these courses both within and across grade levels.

Method

The SHEP surveys were distributed to a representative sample of 365 randomly selected middle and high schools throughout the state of Oregon in the spring of 2002. Data collection was coordinated and conducted through the Oregon Department of Education in cooperation with the Oregon Department of Human Services. The person most knowledgeable about the physical education program at each school was requested to complete the Lead Physical Education Specialist Module--Lifetime Fitness for Health Supplement. Because the supplemental questions were included as part of the original survey, their stylistic quality and response format had to resemble that of the overall questionnaire. This meant response options were limited to simple frequency counts.

Lifetime Fitness for Health courses were described on the survey instrument as primarily lecture-lab or classroom-based courses focused on wellness-related topics. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Oregon State University, and participation was confidential and voluntary. Follow-up telephone calls and written reminders were used to encourage survey completion. In total, 129 people responded on behalf of their respective schools to the questions included in the Lifetime Fitness for Health Supplement (35.3% response rate). While less than ideal, it is interesting to note that this is virtually identical to the 35 percent response rate observed in a recently completed study of physical education teachers' ratings of Texas' required "Foundations of Personal Fitness" course (Wilking & Corbin, 2002). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

"Lifetime Fitness for Health" Course Assessment: Implications for Curriculum Improvement; Lifetime Fitness for Health Courses Can Have a Positive Influence on Students' Physical Activity Attitudes and Behavior
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.