Flashback: Pride on Parade; Richard Fletcher on the Ties That Bind the Old Boys of the Liverpool Scottish Regiment

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), October 29, 2005 | Go to article overview

Flashback: Pride on Parade; Richard Fletcher on the Ties That Bind the Old Boys of the Liverpool Scottish Regiment


Byline: Richard Fletcher

IF ANYONE questioned the strength of spirit that ties the old boys of the Liverpool Scottish Regiment together, they need only have been stood in the Adelphi hotel last Friday for an answer. Those staying at the hotel were treated to the pipes and drums of the Regimental Association beating the retreat as they made their presence felt at the start of their 75th annual dinner.

Although many of the members meet regularly, the dinner was particularly special because it was attended by other members of the territorial 51st Highland Regiment, of which the Liverpool Scottish was a part.

And Bob Lynch, 69, of Mossley Hill, who organised the event, was in no doubt as to what it meant to him to meet old comrades.

"It was great to see them," he says. "They're great friends - some of the best friends you'll ever meet."

Bob joined the Liverpool Scottish Regiment in June 1967, three months after the regiment had become part of the 51st Scottish Highlanders.

He was therefore well-acquainted with the new guests, including the Black Watch from Dundee and Perth, the Queen's Own Highlanders from Inverness and the Queen's Cameron Highlanders from Edinburgh.

Bob had served his national service in the Royal Artillery. But no sooner had he left than his two brothers - who were already territorials in the Liverpool Scottish - "coaxed" him back in.

The regiment saw service in Cyprus and was in Paphos when the Turkish army invaded in 1974. Many of the dinner guests had been alongside Bob at the time.

"There were a lot there," he says. "On the table I was sat at, all except one had been out there in Cyprus. …

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Flashback: Pride on Parade; Richard Fletcher on the Ties That Bind the Old Boys of the Liverpool Scottish Regiment
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