Advice for Dancers: Former New York City Ballet Dancer Linda Hamilton, Ph.D., Is a Lecturer, a Psychologist in Private Practice, and the Author of Advice for Dancers (Jossey-Bass). She Has Been Offering Advice to Dance Magazine Readers since 1992

By Hamilton, Linda | Dance Magazine, November 2005 | Go to article overview

Advice for Dancers: Former New York City Ballet Dancer Linda Hamilton, Ph.D., Is a Lecturer, a Psychologist in Private Practice, and the Author of Advice for Dancers (Jossey-Bass). She Has Been Offering Advice to Dance Magazine Readers since 1992


Hamilton, Linda, Dance Magazine


All I ever wanted was to get accepted into a major professional school that's affiliated with a company, now that it's happened, I'm sure they've made a terrible mistake. Why did I pass the audition? My parents don't take my dancing seriously. They just want me to dance for fun and concentrate on getting god grades so I can go to a good college. If I fail to do well in this dance school, my dream of getting into a dance company is over.--Jinxed Dancer Bronxville, NY

In case you've forgotten, you just received good news. Why not enjoy it? While it's normal to get antsy before starting a demanding training program, most dancers settle down once they meet their new teachers and develop a routine. Still, self-doubt can linger without parental support, so it might help to let your family know that going to a professional school doesn't prevent you from attending college. Also, remember: professional training programs have their pick of talented dancers. Practice stress management by telling yourself, "I can do this!" The trick, of course, is to believe it. You can break your negative thinking by asking yourself what you'd say to your best friend--then say it to yourself.

I guess I'm lucky because my artistic director isn't a tyrant. My major complaint is that he tends to get caught up in the flavor of the month. I feel like I've been pushed aside for the upcoming season, with only a few good roles coming my way. How do I stay inspired if I can't inspire him?--Forlorn Star, NY, NY

All performers not only need to be good at what they do, but also to please directors, dance critics, and choreographers in order to succeed. Yet putting your self-esteem in the hands of others leaves you vulnerable, especially if they are ignoring you. Rather than feeling down, discover inspiration within yourself, so that when you perform, you pay attention to what gives you satisfaction. Don't let your boss--or your critics-come between you and your audience.

I'm a hard-core dance lover who experiences awe whenever a performer defies the laws of gravity. The best dancers perform amazing feats that look effortless. The production also seems to go smoothly watching from the audience, although who knows what happens behind the scenes, what is it like when there's a real emergency? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Advice for Dancers: Former New York City Ballet Dancer Linda Hamilton, Ph.D., Is a Lecturer, a Psychologist in Private Practice, and the Author of Advice for Dancers (Jossey-Bass). She Has Been Offering Advice to Dance Magazine Readers since 1992
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.