The Long Hard Road to a U.S. Passport

Daily Mail (London), November 1, 2005 | Go to article overview

The Long Hard Road to a U.S. Passport


Byline: WILLIAM LOWTHER

GAINING American citizenship is a long and difficult process which involves several levels of checks and examinations.

It starts with a so-called 'green card', which is actually pink, and allows the holder to live and work in the U.S. as a resident alien.

Securing the card can take years, although a few are handed out to applicants who enter a government lottery.

Generally the cards go only to the close relatives of those who are already citizens or to those with qualifications that the Department of Justice believes will benefit the nation.

Currently, nuclear physicists, some university professors, aeronautical engineers and fully qualified nurses are in demand.

After living and working in the U.S. with a green card for five years, during which the card can be taken away and the immigrant deported if he commits a crime, it becomes possible to apply for naturalisation.

This process can again take two or three years to complete.

Along the way, a full FBI background check is made to ensure that no crimes have been committed, that all taxes and debts have been paid or are being paid, and that the applicant has not joined any groups or political parties considered to be anti-American.

Fingerprints are taken and the applicant must undergo a complete medical, including Xrays and blood tests, to prove he will not become a burden on the state's medical services.

Once these procedures have been completed the applicant meets a Department of Immigration examiner, to whom he must demonstrate a working knowledge of English and answer ten questions - picked at random from a list of 100 - on American history and culture.

The questions range from the date of the signing of the Declaration of Independence to the number of years for which a senator is elected.

Migrants can retake the test until officials are satisfied. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Long Hard Road to a U.S. Passport
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.