Erma M. Rauch of St. Charles

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 8, 2005 | Go to article overview

Erma M. Rauch of St. Charles


Erma M. Rauch of St. Charles

A funeral Mass for Erma M. Rauch, 76, will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday, at St. Patrick Church, 408 Cedar St., St. Charles, with Fr. Randy Fronek, celebrant. Burial will be in Resurrection Cemetery, Geneva. Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. today, at the Norris Funeral Home, 100 S. Third St. (three blocks west of the Fox River, one block south of Route 64), St. Charles, where a Rosary will be held at 7:30 p.m. Born Sept. 30, 1929, in Clay County, Ill., the daughter of Edwin and Helen (nee Kuenstler) Kessler, she died Friday, Nov. 4, 2005, at Kindred Hospital in Sycamore. Erma and her late husband of 55 years, Melvin, were united in marriage on April 21, 1949. She has been a member of St. Patrick Catholic Church for over 45 years.

All who knew Erma, whether as a wife, mother, sister, or friend were touched by her faith and good character. She was greatly blessed. Her faith carried her through many joys and challenges. Music and family were her source of happiness. Country music, German polkas, piano playing, holiday visits with family, quiet talks with her children and friends among other interests, brought her a quiet appreciation of her many blessings in life. Along with family and friends, her heart was touched by visits with those whom she had babysat in her earlier years while raising her own large family. Mrs. Rauch is survived by her children, William (Linda) Rauch of Geneva, John (Debra) Rauch of St. Charles, Norine (Dr. Albert) Smith of Lyford, Texas, Irene (Ronald) Hammer of Elgin, Ramona (Michael) Fales of Yorba Linda, Calif., Mary (Terry) Vedin of Batavia, Katherine (William) Lothian of Miami, Fla. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Erma M. Rauch of St. Charles
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.