Hypnotic Psychotherapy with Sex Offenders

By Moseley, Sullivan; Briggs, Wanda P. et al. | Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling, October 2005 | Go to article overview

Hypnotic Psychotherapy with Sex Offenders


Moseley, Sullivan, Briggs, Wanda P., Magnus, Virginia, Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling


The authors review the literature on the prevalence of sex offenders; multiple treatment modalities; and implications of the use of hypnotic psychotherapy, coupled with cognitive behavioral treatment programs, for treating sex offenders.

**********

Sex offenders and the offenses they commit have been topics of discussion by the American public for years. In the 1990s, for example, the State of Washington became the first state to pass legislation requiring communities to be notified when a sex offender returns to a community. In 1994, when Megan Kanka was raped and murdered, there was a public outcry to establish community notification laws across the United States; as a result, Megan's Law became effective on May 17,1996 (Jones, 1999). Megan's Law requires states to register convicted sex offenders of crimes against children and also allows states to make both private and personal information about sex offenders available to the communities in which they live. The expectation is that the release of information on registered sex offenders will protect American children and increase public safety.

Law enforcement agencies in the United States are disturbed by the number of sex crimes that occur and the impact they have on the lives of Americans, particularly the lives of children (U.S. Department of Justice, 2000). The Uniform Crime Reporting Program recently developed a reporting system, the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS), to offer the law enforcement and the academic communities more comprehensive data for management, training, planning, research, and other uses. The NIBRS includes a comprehensive description of sexual assaults and provides information regarding victim injury; the victim's perception of offenders, age, gender, race, and ethnicity; and the victim-offender relationship. This reporting system also gathers information on all offenses that occur in an incident, the weapons used, the location of the incident, arrests, and victim refusal to cooperate in the investigation (U.S. Department of Justice, 2000).

On any day in the United States, approximately 234,000 persons are convicted of sexual assault or rape and are in the care, custody, or control of correctional agencies; approximately 60% of these offenders live in local communities under conditional supervision (U.S. Department of Justice, 1997).

In this article, we present a brief overview of the characteristics of sex offenders. In addition, we discuss the implications of using hypnotic psychotherapy in conjunction with cognitive behavior therapy and relapse prevention as a treatment for such offenders.

Characterizing Offenses

Most sex offenders are male, and they assault children under the age of 6 years. Juveniles under the age of 18 committed approximately 23% of all sexual assaults, whereas 77% of sexual assaults were committed by adults. Nearly 45% of all forcible fondling cases are committed by adults between the ages of 18 and 24 years and juvenile offenders under the age of 12 years. Adult offenders over the age of 34 years accounted for the remaining percentages of forcible fondling. The NIBRS also reported that 40% of juvenile offenders under the age of 12 years committed sexual offenses involving sexual assaults with an object and forcible sodomies. Overall, the victims of juvenile offenders are children under the age of 11 years. Alarmingly, the largest number of juvenile sex offenders are 14 years of age, a fact that is a major concern for the public and for law enforcement officials (U.S. Department of Justice, 2000). Table 1 presents the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) four offense categories for sexual assault and the percentages of the offense committed by specific age of offender.

Family members perpetrate nearly 30% of all sexual offenses, and approximately half of the victims are under the age of 6 years. Of the remaining sexual offenses, almost 60% are committed by an acquaintance of the victim and less than 14% by strangers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hypnotic Psychotherapy with Sex Offenders
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.