Journal of Addictions and Offender Counseling Submission Patterns, Topic Areas, and Authors: 1999-2004

By Juhnke, Gerald A.; Bordeau, Wendy Charkow et al. | Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling, October 2005 | Go to article overview

Journal of Addictions and Offender Counseling Submission Patterns, Topic Areas, and Authors: 1999-2004


Juhnke, Gerald A., Bordeau, Wendy Charkow, Evanoff, James C., Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling


In October 2001, an article was published in the Journal of Addictions and Offender Counseling (JAOC) to examine the journal's submission patterns, topic areas, and authors from 1979 through 1998. The current authors reviewed articles published in JAOC between 1999 and 2004 to provide an updated analysis of the types of information published in the journal and the authors who submit them.

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The first historical examination of the Journal of Addictions and Offender Counseling (JAOC) regarding the journal's archival contents and authors was published in 2001 (Charkow & Juhnke, 2001). The purpose of the original article was to provide, for the years 1979-1998, a historical context for contemporary issues in the field of addictions and offender counseling, demonstrate the development of addictions and offender counseling as a counseling subspecialty, and forecast key challenges and needs for the future. Similarly, other journals in counseling and related professions have also recently published such articles (i.e., Buboltz, Miller, & Williams, 1999; Skinner, Robinson, & Brown, 1999; Sprenkle, Bailey, Lyness, Ball, & Mills, 1997; Weinrach, Lustig, Chan, & Thomas, 1998). We present a brief review of the original article, and interested readers are encouraged to refer to the full article for a detailed history of JAOC and its publication trends (Charkow & Juhnke, 2001).

Major findings of the original analysis indicated that men were more likely than women to author JAOC articles, despite the fact that 60% of the membership of the International Association of Addictions and Offender Counseling (IAAOC) are women. The gender gap in authorship decreased significantly, however, between 1979 and 1998. Additionally, first authors were more likely to reside in the South Atlantic and the East North Central regions of the United States. An analysis of first author professional title and employment status indicated that most authors were affiliated with universities, particularly in departments within the counseling profession.

Regarding content type, the majority of articles focused on offender issues, although matters related to addictions gained increased exposure over time. Furthermore, earlier articles were more likely to be focused on career, education, and training issues, whereas later articles focused more specifically on clinical issues, such as the interface of family counseling with addictions counseling and treatment of specific substance addictions. The client population most likely to be addressed in earlier articles was adult males, although later articles focused more on adolescent populations and women. Additionally, empirically based articles were more prevalent in later editions of the journal, reflecting the growth and professionalism of the field.

When the original JAOC submission pattern article (Charkow & Juhnke, 2001) was published, the journal's editor, Virginia Kelly, indicated that goals for the future of JAOC included a balanced addictions/offender emphasis, an increase in empirical research studies, and further specialized sections focusing on contemporary topics of interest in research and practice. The purpose of the current article is to update the information in submission patterns, topic areas, and authors for the period from 1999 to 2004 and draw conclusions regarding the state of the journal, the profession, and the future directions of both.

Method

We analyzed each article published in JAOC during the 1999-2004 period according to the first author's demographic characteristics (i.e., name, employment setting, sex, geographic location, professional position/title). We then reviewed, analyzed, and separated the article contents according to offender or substance abuse topics; article type (i.e., clinical/practice vs. empirical research); specific populations indicated; and clinical, career, professional, and training issues presented.

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