Tough Stance on Immigrants Boosts Sarkozy; Riots Hurt Chirac's Popularity

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 17, 2005 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Tough Stance on Immigrants Boosts Sarkozy; Riots Hurt Chirac's Popularity


Byline: David R. Sands, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

French Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy's strong law-and-order line on the country's urban riots is playing well with voters, while the popularity of President Jacques Chirac has plummeted, according to new public opinion polls released yesterday.

Some 68 percent of French voters surveyed said they approved of Mr. Sarkozy's tough stand on the nightly riots that have plagued immigrant, mainly Muslim, suburban enclaves in Paris and other cities for three weeks, according to a survey in the French newspaper Le Point.

By contrast, Mr. Chirac, who was virtually invisible in the first weeks of France's worst domestic violence in 40 years, received support from just 41 percent of voters, with 54 percent critical of his performance.

The backlash from the violence was evident as two prominent officials - the employment minister and a leader of a right-wing party in parliament - said that polygamy practiced in some immigrant families had contributed to the breakdown of social order that fueled the riots.

The polygamy theme often has been cited by far-right, anti-immigration figures as one sign of the threat now facing traditional French values.

"There is clearly a problem with the integration of immigrants and, more importantly, their children," Bernard Accoyer, head of the conservative Union for a Popular Majority party, said in a radio interview.

Polygamy is "certainly one of the causes [of the riots], though not the only one," he said.

A separate poll published over the weekend put Mr. Sarkozy just ahead of Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin, his main rival on the center-right in the 2007 presidential race, on their response to the violence.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Tough Stance on Immigrants Boosts Sarkozy; Riots Hurt Chirac's Popularity
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?