"Down the Garden Path: The Artist's Garden after Modernism"; Queens Museum of Art

By Harris, Larissa | Artforum International, November 2005 | Go to article overview

"Down the Garden Path: The Artist's Garden after Modernism"; Queens Museum of Art


Harris, Larissa, Artforum International


Curator Valerie Smith seemed to have chosen works for "Down the Garden Path: The Artist's Garden After Modernism" not simply to illustrate a theme, but to enrich it. Fleshing out a well-installed selection of actual works, photographic documentation, and plans for unrealized projects with five new artists' gardens commissioned for Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Smith's exhibition proposed the garden as a model for human influence on the environment, while positioning it as a lens through which to view the diversification of artistic strategies since the 1960s.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Works offering ecology as the foundation for a better way of life were here given a complex genealogy. Represented by photographs and sketches, Alan Sonfist's Time Landscape, initiated in 1965 and realized in 1978, is a slice of Manhattan as the Dutch might have found it, restaged and still thriving at the corner of West Houston and LaGuardia Place. It's a mass of untended undergrowth, an antilandscape wholly beyond the Romantic notion of the cultivated wild. More recent works of public art documented or realized at or near the Queens Museum participate in the genre's recent trend toward blending radical idealism and aesthetics with the concerns of other disciplines and communities.

Mel Chin and Rufus Chaney's Revival Field, 1991-93, documented here in photographs, is a sculpture in the form of a plot of toxic-metal-absorbing vegetation planted at Pig's Eye Landfill in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Closer to home were Nils Norman's The Gerard Winstanley Radical Gardening Space Reclamation Mobile Field Center and Weather Station Prototype, 1999, a bicycle-drawn minicaravan containing a library, a photocopier, and weather-detection instruments, which was parked on the museum's first floor, and Lonnie Graham's Jardines Gemelos de las Americas (Twin Gardens of the Americas), 2005, thriving just outside the building's entrance. …

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