Bump on Head Does Good for Warrior, Target Earth

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 3, 2005 | Go to article overview

Bump on Head Does Good for Warrior, Target Earth


Byline: Joseph Szadkowski, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Thanks to the proliferation of film, comic book and cartoon characters, companies are bombarding consumers with an incredible selection of action figures. With tongue in cheek, let's take a peek at some of the specimens worthy of a place in ...

Zad's Toy Vault.

Super Saiyan Goku vs. Frieza

JAKKS Pacific continues to celebrate Akira Toriyama's famed Japanese anime and manga series Dragon Ball Z with a new set of 5-inch tall, multi-articulated action figures.

Its Series 11 collection is especially impressive as each character features limited-edition paint schemes paying homage to Mr. Toriyama's black-and-white comic book series from the 1980s and 1990s.

Fans can choose from Cell vs. Super Saiyan 2 Trunks, Piccolo vs. battle-damaged Goku and a legendary hero taking on a nearly unstoppable foe.

Figure profile: According to the official Dragon Ball Z Web site (www.dragonballz.com), "Goku is the hero of Dragon Ball Z, the most powerful warrior on Earth and the first to become Super Saiyan in more than 1,000 years. Goku was sent to Earth as a baby to grow up and destroy the planet, but a head injury as a child scrambled his programming. Instead of growing up to become a destructive superwarrior, he became innocent and pure of heart, fighting for good.

"Frieza is a lizard-like creature who can shape-shift into four stages of forms and is feared as the most powerful and evil being in the universe with no rival being even close to his strength. Upon learning about the legendary Namekian Dragon Balls, Frieza is consumed with a desire to obtain the orbs, summon the Dragon, and gain his wish for immortality."

Accessories: The Super Saiyan Goku comes with a removable dark-blue-cloth vest to highlight his flaming silver hair. The almost all-white Frieza gets nothing but a tail and piercing red eyes.

Price: $19.99

Read all about it: Viz Media has translated much of the Dragon Ball Z sequential-art books for American audiences. More than 20 volumes averaging 190 pages each can currently be purchased ($7.95 each) that present the original right-to-left, black-and-white stories.

Words to buy by: The gorgeous-looking figures will score a decisive Kamahameha (one of Goku's famed power attacks) on fans as they are blown away by the very presence of these gems. However, some of the joints on the more complex figures, such as Cell, can get very loose after some heavy-duty play action from the 6- to 10-year-old demographic, making them virtually impossible to stand up without some help.

Spirit Iron-Knife

Hasbro's G.I. Joe franchise gets reborn in a new line of 8-inch action figures and Fox's 4Kids TV cartoon, both based on the continuing battles with the dreaded COBRA organization. Children can choose from accessory-loaded, multi-articulated versions of Duke, Heavy Duty, Snake Eyes, Storm Shadow and an heroic American Indian archer.

Figure profile: Spirit Iron-Knife started in field operations and was selected for the most difficult missions because of his outstanding ability to see overlooked clues. He was soon promoted to covert operations and used his tracking skills to uncover criminals who could conceal their existence. He is a highly skilled marksman with his bow, using technologically advanced arrows, and also is an expert at creating small, precisely targeted explosions that disable mechanical or electronic systems.

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