Skynyrd's 'Southern' Is International

By Woods, Mark | The Florida Times Union, November 20, 2005 | Go to article overview

Skynyrd's 'Southern' Is International


Woods, Mark, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Mark Woods

Elmehdi Zaoui is 22 years old. He lives in Rabat, the capital of Morocco, just up the coast from Casablanca.

He plays in a band with three buddies. And while the classical music of his country is full of stringed instruments that have changed little in centuries -- the rebab, kemanjah and 'oud -- Zaoui prefers a guitar. An electric guitar. Kind of like the ones the guys in Lynyrd Skynyrd played.

"It's the greatest band in the world," Zaoui said.

So far, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame voters haven't agreed. There are nearly 150 performers, either individuals or bands, enshrined in the Cleveland building. But despite six nominations and some aggressive campaigns by radio stations and fans, Skynyrd still isn't one of them.

An announcement of the latest class of inductees is expected to come sometime in the next few weeks. And while there's little reason to believe that the seventh nomination will be the charm for Skynyrd, it's worth telling the story of how the band with North Florida roots has at least four fans in North Africa.

Zaoui and his friends weren't alive in 1977, when a small plane crashed in some swampy Mississippi woods, killing three band members, including leader Ronnie Van Zant.

They grew up an ocean away from Jacksonville, closer to Algeria than Alabama. Yet if you ask them what song they want to hear, they'll say Free Bird. Or perhaps Simple Man. Or maybe something from Gimme Back My Bullets.

That's Zaoui's favorite Skynyrd album. It's what he was listening to a few weeks ago when he sent me an e-mail.

Let me backtrack for a moment. I first heard from Zaoui after he went to one of the many Web sites full of Skynyrd information and found a link to a column I wrote last year, shortly before the sixth Hall snub.

"Hello, I'm from Morocco, and I'm a diehard fan of Lynyrd Skynyrd," he wrote.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Skynyrd's 'Southern' Is International
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.