Labor Contractors: Federal Investigations

By Galnor, Matt | The Florida Times Union, November 20, 2005 | Go to article overview

Labor Contractors: Federal Investigations


Galnor, Matt, The Florida Times Union


Byline: MATT GALNOR

HENRY CALLOWAY

2000: Investigated in Dover, Del. Fined $2,050 for not disclosing conditions to workers until they got there; providing less than 50 square feet in one of the rooms; letting unlicensed people drive workers; not having enough insurance; not registering as a contractor; and using an unregistered employee to supervise workers.

2001: Investigated in Palatka. Fined $1,300 for not disclosing conditions and misrepresenting conditions to workers; failing to post housing conditions; not providing safe vehicles or making sure the driver had a valid license; not registering employees; and not applying to amend his registration certificate.

RONALD EVANS SR.

1988: Investigated in Newton Grove, N.C. Fined $1,350 for not having enough insurance, using an unregistered labor contractor to supervise a crew and not amending his registration as a contractor.

1989: Paid $4,000 to settle a lawsuit filed by 12 former employees in North Carolina, claiming they weren't told of conditions of employment. The suit also claims Evans sold beer and crack at the camp, loaned money at "usurious" interest rates and told employees they owed him at the end of the week. Evans did not admit guilt in the settlement, but agreed to a list of regulations he'd follow.

1992: Investigated in Newton Grove, N.C. Fined $4,060 for nine different violations, including misrepresenting conditions to workers, not paying employees wages when due, not keeping payroll records; and providing housing that does not meet health and safety requirements.

WILLIE LEE "BUDDY" SIMMONS

1999: Investigated in Pomona Park. Case forwarded to U.S. Attorney, but nothing ever done, records show. Recommended fine of $11,900 for violations including not having a contractors license; not paying back fines due in 1991; not paying minimum wage to employees; charging 100 percent interest on wage advances; and not giving payroll records to employees.

RON UZZLE

1991: Investigated in Elkton. Fined $1,341 for minimum wage violations. The money was divided among three employees who were owed back wages.

1993: Investigated in Elkton. Fined $1,300 for failing to ensure safe and healthy housing.

1995: Investigated in Elkton. Fined $1,000 for unsafe transport of workers. A van with six workers was going 90 mph in Elkton, according to police. The van, which had at least one bald tire, hit a tree, killing three people including the driver. Everyone in the vehicle had high levels of alcohol and cocaine in their systems, police said.

1998: Investigated in Elkton. Fined $4,700 for violations including failing to disclose conditions to workers; not posting workers' rights and housing conditions; not keeping payroll records at least 3 years; not providing wage statements; using unsafe vehicles; using an uncertified and unlicensed driver; and not having enough insurance.

IZEAL WILLIS

1998: Investigated in Elkton. Fined $5,950 for unsafe housing conditions. Initially would be charged back wages because workers were charged $16 a week in rent, but investigators could not prove workers paid for the housing (not enough documentation in pay stubs).

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Labor Contractors: Federal Investigations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.