New Ad Role Eyed for Cartoon Characters; Report Seeks Promotion of Healthy Food Habits

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 7, 2005 | Go to article overview

New Ad Role Eyed for Cartoon Characters; Report Seeks Promotion of Healthy Food Habits


Byline: Marguerite Higgins, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Cartoon characters like SpongeBob SquarePants and Shrek should promote healthy foods instead of junk food to children ages 12 and younger, a government report said yesterday.

The report, by the Institute of Medicine at the National Academies, examined 123 scientific studies to determine the role food ads, particularly those on television, play in children's eating habits.

"Current food and beverage marketing practices put kids' long-term health at risk," said J. Michael McGinnis, a senior scholar at the nonprofit scientific society, which was established in 1970 to advise Congress on medical care and health matters.

Congress last year requested the study, which took about a year and $700,000 to put together.

"Strong evidence" shows youth-directed food ads, which primarily market foods high in calories, fat and sugar, influence the food preferences of children ages 2 to 11, the study said. But the study did not quantify the ads' influence.

While food and beverage ads are a factor in the nation's rising childhood obesity rate, the institute stopped short of blaming the industry for causing weight gain in children.

About 16 percent of children, ages 6 to 19, are overweight, according to the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The institute urged manufacturers and restaurants to shift more of the estimated $10 billion they spend on child-targeted ads annually toward products that are lower in calories and higher in nutritional content. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Ad Role Eyed for Cartoon Characters; Report Seeks Promotion of Healthy Food Habits
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.