Thus Said ... How the World Sees Us

American Libraries, March 2005 | Go to article overview
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Thus Said ... How the World Sees Us


"What they ought to do is take 30 years of his monologues and have them in libraries all over the country. For somebody studying the '60s or the '70s or the '80s, the first two years of the '90s, go into the library and check out Johnny's monologues, and you'd get a feel of what the '70s were like, what the '60s were like." Long time sidekick on The Tonight Show ED McMAHON talking about Johnny Carson's legacy, NBC's Today Show, January 24.

"Behind the bright smiles of the librarians, there is tension. They've worked their tails off to earn master's degrees, only to be forced to subdue the ancient art of shushing and become mere clerks. The humiliation they must feel checking out an Ashlee Simpson CD to some punk who could care less about Melvil Dewey is probably unbearable." Staff writer DA-VID HARSANYI on his visit to the Denver Public Library system's Schlessman Family branch, which he described as a noisy, free Barnes and Noble, Denver Post, January 6.

"For people who are really interested in finding out about things and engaging ideas, the excitement of libraries is sensual and visceral as well as cerebral." Columnist JOHN V. FLEMING from "Libraries, the Princeton Campus's Unknown Repository of Sexiness" about January as Reading Period at the New Jersey university, Daily Princetonian, January 17.

"Her mild-mannered look--accentuated by eyeglasses you'd expect to find on a timid librarian--was in stark contrast to her dynamic tone, her actions, and her many accomplishments." About the late Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm from "Portrait of a Courageous Pioneer," New York Daily News, January 9.

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