From Prussia with Hate: Lynx and Lamb Are Californian Twin Sisters Hoping to Become Stars. but, as Carolyn O'Hara Reveals, Their Pop-Country Ballads Represent the Latest Strategy of America's White Supremacists

By O'Hara, Carolyn | New Statesman (1996), November 14, 2005 | Go to article overview

From Prussia with Hate: Lynx and Lamb Are Californian Twin Sisters Hoping to Become Stars. but, as Carolyn O'Hara Reveals, Their Pop-Country Ballads Represent the Latest Strategy of America's White Supremacists


O'Hara, Carolyn, New Statesman (1996)


Lynx and Lamb Gaede, blonde twins from Bakersfield, California, have a lot riding on their 13-year-old shoulders. Their hit musical group, Prussian Blue (an allusion to their German ancestry and shiny blue eyes), is due to release a second album soon and, like all teen stars, they must tackle homework, teenage angst and a busy performing schedule with equal gusto.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

They also just happen to represent the future of the white nationalist movement in America.

"We're proud of being white, we want to keep being white," Lynx told ABC News recently. "We want our people to stay white ... we don't want to just be, you know, a big muddle. We just want to preserve our race." The girls have been performing to siegheiling white crowds across the country since they were nine. With Lynx on the violin and Lamb strumming the guitar, they harmonise on pop-country ballads written by their white nationalist heroes and perform folk covers of songs by white power metal bands. They've even tried their hands at writing their own material, such as their original "Aryan Man Awake": "Where freedom exists for only those with darker skin ... Aryan man awake/How much more will you take/Turn that fear to hate."

Leaders of white supremacist groups couldn't be happier about their new spokesgirls. "Imagine the hard sell that the ADL [Anti-Defamation League] and the SPLC [Southern Poverty Law Center] will have when confronted with these angelic-looking young girls who are wise to their anti-white schemes," a National Vanguard spokesman said recently. "I see an avenue opened up to family-oriented white men, women and children that has not been opened before."

White power enthusiasts are depending on groups such as Prussian Blue to attract new followers and break free of the violent, death metal image their music has traditionally had. The popular bands on Resistance Records, the premier white power music company in the United States (and Prussian Blue's label), have names such as Angry Aryans and Race War, which feed the rage of hard-core movement members with lyrics such as "Browntown burning down/Negro in flames rolling on the ground".

Prussian Blue's strategy, however, is to appeal to impressionable potential converts. They present an opportunity for the white power movement to tap into the coveted "tween" market, made up of kids aged eight to 12, a market estimated to be worth an astonishing $335bn per year, and to tempt adults attracted by fresh-faced youngsters and soft pop sounds.

In photographs on their website, the blonde twins smile wholesomely as they frolic in fields of wild flowers and romp at the playground, like normal girls. But then we see them hard at work in the recording studio, and posing with Tom Metzger, former Grand Dragon of the Ku Klux Klan, who in 1990 was found guilty of inciting skinheads to murder an Ethiopian student.

The girls have been compared to another pair of young blonde moguls, the Olsen twins, who have built a multimedia empire of movies, clothing lines and music albums. Lynx and Lamb may be taking a lesson from the Olsens' marketing strategy book. One photo shows them giddily modelling a clothing line called Aryan Wear, each bedecked in a T-shirt with the classic yellow smiley face icon. The Olsens' marketing is politics-free; with Prussian Blue, the smiley faces bear Hitler cowlicks and moustaches.

While it's difficult to track the success of the white nationalist music scene, Devin Burghart of Turn It Down, a watchdog campaign targeting white power bands, estimates that more than a million albums are sold each year through movement websites, festivals, hate rallies and mom-and-pop record shops. Most mainstream stores won't stock the records, but the albums move sufficiently well to line the pockets of hate groups with a few million dollars each year. And since music has shown itself to be such a profitable commodity, white power groups are looking to diversify their sound. …

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