Maritime Security

By Wade, Jared | Risk Management, December 2005 | Go to article overview

Maritime Security


Wade, Jared, Risk Management


MOST FOREIGN TRADE IN THE UNITED STATES IS TRANSPORTED BY WAY OF MARITIME SHIPPING, MAKING THIS INDUSTRY A KEYSTONE OF THE U.S. ECONOMY. IN AN AGE OF SEVERE TERRORISM RISK, SECURING THE NATION'S MARITIME SHIPPING IS A MAJOR CONCERN, ONE THAT HAS BEEN NOTED REPEATEDLY BY THE MEDIA, POLITICAL FIGURES AND BIJSINESS LEADERS. AND WHILE U.S. MARITIME SECURITY HAS INDEED MADE NOTEWORTHY FORWARD PROGRESS OVER THE LAST FOUR YEARS, MUCH WORK IS YET TO BE DONE

When viewed in the broadest sense, maritime security in the United States can be considered strong. On the micro level, however, many large cargo ships still experience a fair amount of "shrinkage"--the term used to define missing, lost or stolen goods--at seaports around the country. The trafficking of illegal cargo is also a continual problem that is most often associated with drugs, but it can also include illegal aliens, weapons and any number of other more innocuous commodities.

In reality, such activity has always had a negative economic and operational effect on the maritime shipping industry, but by-and-large, these issues have been marginalized, and there are few who would honestly expect to see such illegal actions removed from the industry entirely. Most everyone finds such behavior reprehensible, of course, but they would also agree that this is a relatively un-avoidable consequence in an industry that handless-even million containers per year in the United States alone.

But the goal at each seaport is always zero tolerance when it comes to all illegal activity, and preventing this type of crime is what was traditionally meant when referring to port security and cargo protection.

Then came September 11.

"Until 9/11, maritime security meant preventing smuggling, theft, illegal aliens and drug trafficking," said former CIA Director James Woolsey at this year's annual Maritime Security Expo in New York's Jacob Javits Center. "But now that we have seen our own infrastructure used against us, the stakes have changed and seaport security has become a whole new world."

Preventing shrinkage, drug trafficking and illegal immigration are all still obvious priorities for any port, but these crimes have dropped down on the priority scale in lieu of every security operation's new number one priority--preventing terrorism.

"The last time prior to September 11 that our own infrastructure was used against us by a foreign enemy, was when the British burned down the White House in 1814," said Woolsey. "And it is largely because of this perceived safety that became ingrained over our history that virtually none of our infrastructure networks, including maritime security, were developed to protect against intentional interference, namely terrorism."

But that is changing. For over four years, the U.S. shipping industry has been striving to reform its ingrained inadequacies. But is it enough?

Legislative and Regulatory Efforts

It was not long after September 11 that the maritime shipping industry realized that it too was potentially vulnerable to an attack in which its own infrastructure could be used against itself. And like changes affecting all other aspects of transportation and interstate trafficking, Washington and the newly formed Department of Homeland Security soon began work on their goal of "implementing an integrated and collaborative process among international, federal, state, local and private partners to protect our ports and maritime infrastructure by gaining the greatest intelligence about the people, cargo, and vessels operating in our waters and ports."

Another important component was that, while security and crime prevention was clearly the goal, any measures that would be implemented could not come at the expense of the shipping industry's livelihood. At the time, it was estimated that 90% of all of the world's cargo was moved on container ships and that nearly half of all cargo that entered the United States came by sea.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Maritime Security
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.