Department of Defense Values ACA Accreditation

By Haasenritter, David | Corrections Today, December 2005 | Go to article overview

Department of Defense Values ACA Accreditation


Haasenritter, David, Corrections Today


During the past 15 years that I have been involved in military corrections, my superiors, peers and subordinates have asked the questions why accreditation and what does it do for Department of Defense (DOD) corrections? These questions are usually from people who do not understand the accreditation process and its benefits. I have had to answer these questions as a facility security officer, facility deputy and central office administrator. My initial response was to say that we expect our universities, medical facilities and other services to be accredited, so why not our correctional facilities? I then explained specific benefits of accreditation and closed with the fact that if we believe we do corrections in an excellent manner, we should not be afraid to have an outside agency verify it. In the past 15 years, I have observed the positive impact American Correctional Association' standards and accreditation have had on the Department of Defense correctional system, and I would like to share some of the benefits of ACA standards and the accreditation process.

Professional collaboration between DOD and ACA dates back to the first meeting of the American Prison Association. The first ACA-accredited DOD correctional facility was the Army's U.S. Disciplinary Barracks in 1988. In 1989, the Navy constructed two new facilities following ACA physical plant standards and both were later accredited in 1993 and 1994. Since then, the Army has accredited all its stateside and overseas facilities (though one stateside facility is no longer accredited). The United States Marine Corps accredited two of its stateside facilities in the early 2000s. Since that initial accreditation, the DOD correctional system has used ACA standards and the accreditation process to design, construct and operate its facilities.

Standards: A Guiding Light

ACA standards can provide a facility and central office with a guide in developing policy and procedures to operate facilities and manage the system. These standards, developed by experts in the industry, and some by case law, are national standards and have been determined best practices. By incorporating these standards into DOD policies and procedures, and daily operations, DOD facilities have become more efficient and safer for inmates and staff. These standards have lead to policy and operational consistency across the military correctional system. Standards require post orders, which improve consistency among correctional officers at military facilities that rotate staff every one to three years. The standards provide leaders with management tools to use in developing procedures, setting goals and objectives, and managing staff training. Standards improve compliance levels with and support from other disciplines such as fire, safety and health. The military has used ACA standards as one of its references for policy, procedure and daily operations for its detainee facilities overseas.

The accreditation process has provided standards to design and renovate DOD facilities. All new military facilities established since ACA standards were developed have been designed to meet those standards. The standards were used to support and develop new facility design requirements and ensured DOD met fire-life-safety standards. Through the accreditation process, noncompliant, physical plant standards required a plan of action, some of which resulted in renovations to become compliant with the standards. When asked why a facility needed certain physical plant requirements. DOD correctional leaders were always able to use ACA standards as the industry standard.

Accreditation requires that internal monitoring methods be established to ensure the facility complies with service regulations, national standards, best practices, annual reviews of operations, programs, fire-safety procedures, training needs, etc. Accreditation assists commanders by providing a checklist to determine strengths and weaknesses; a system to measure performance and track trends. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Department of Defense Values ACA Accreditation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.