Schumer Warns of Filibuster of Alito; Panel Hearings to Begin Today

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 9, 2006 | Go to article overview
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Schumer Warns of Filibuster of Alito; Panel Hearings to Begin Today


Byline: Charles Hurt, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Democrats said yesterday that they may block the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr., depending on the answers the nominee gives at his Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings, which begin today.

Sen. Charles E. Schumer, New York Democrat and a member of the committee, said that if Judge Alito refuses to answer questions on issues that Democrats deem vital, the party will be more likely to block the nomination.

"If he continuously, given his previous record, refused to answer questions and hid behind 'I can't answer this because it might come before me,' it would increase the chances of a filibuster," Mr. Schumer said.

Also yesterday, another Judiciary Committee Democrat said she would likely block the nomination if she concludes that Judge Alito would overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that declared abortion a constitutional right.

"If I believed he was going to go in there and overthrow Roe ... most likely 'yes,' " said Sen. Dianne Feinstein, California Democrat, when asked on "Fox News Sunday" whether she would filibuster the nomination.

In 1985, Judge Alito wrote an application essay for a job in the Reagan administration, saying the Constitution contains no right to abortion.

Republicans, meanwhile, prepared to defend President Bush's nominee to replace retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and have laid the groundwork to assure Judge Alito's confirmation.

Majority Leader Bill Frist has said all along that he would employ the "nuclear option" to ban judicial filibusters if Democrats lodge one against this nominee. But Mr. Frist doesn't have public commitments from the 50 senators whom he would need to ban the filibusters.

A deal on judicial nominees struck among the "Gang of 14" senators - seven Republicans and seven Democrats - requires that Democrats allow an up-or-down vote on judicial nominees except under "extraordinary circumstances."

Sen. Lindsey Graham, South Carolina Republican and one of the "Gang of 14," said yesterday that Mr. Frist would get his vote if Democrats blocked Judge Alito based on his stance on abortion or Roe v. Wade.

"I would consider that not only not an extraordinary circumstance, but a threat to the independence of the judiciary, and I would stop it in its tracks with my vote," he said on Fox.

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Schumer Warns of Filibuster of Alito; Panel Hearings to Begin Today
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