Springtime for Hitler: New York Public Library Surveys the Artistic Outcry against Fascism

American Theatre, April 1993 | Go to article overview

Springtime for Hitler: New York Public Library Surveys the Artistic Outcry against Fascism


In the wake of the breakup of the Communist bloc, national pride increasingly seems to be giving way to xenophobia and, even more dangerous, "ethnic cleansing"--an appropriate historical moment to reconsider the 1930s and the dangers of fascism.

The New York Public Library is doing just that: This spring a series of major exhibitions will examine the artistic outcry against fascism's threat to the arts. Through June 12, the Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center will present "It Can't Happen Here: Anti-Fascist Performance in New York." The exhibition, which takes its title from Sinclair Lewis's 1937 play imagining life in a dictator-ruled United States, focuses on anti-fascist work created by performing artists in New York City in the '30s.

The work of many American playwrights, actors, designers and theatre companies will be featured, including Maxwell Anderson's Gods of the Lightning, written in response to the 1927 execution of Sacco and Vanzetti; Zero Mostel's Professor Magenshimmel routine, in which he satirizes the concept of German racial purity he dubbed "Gelegeneinfachsammelungenatkatvat"; and costume designs by Charles Hawkins for the 1938 Federal Theatre Project production Coriolanus: Autocracy versus Democracy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Springtime for Hitler: New York Public Library Surveys the Artistic Outcry against Fascism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.