Music Is Central at Women's Art Show; Several Local Artists Will Be Featured

By Carter, John | The Florida Times Union, December 21, 2005 | Go to article overview

Music Is Central at Women's Art Show; Several Local Artists Will Be Featured


Carter, John, The Florida Times Union


Byline: JOHN CARTER

They're putting their art and soul into an exhibition with a distinctly feminine twist.

The Women's Center of Jacksonville's winter exhibition -- "What Do You See? What Do You Hear?" -- is part of the center's Art & Soul series.

A special reception is set for the exhibition opening set for 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 5, at the Women's Center, 5644 Colcord Ave., in the Clifton area of Arlington.

Regular exhibition view hours will be 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday-Friday through March 22.

The idea of the new exhibition is to "showcase the talents of several local artists who will interpret the relationship between their chosen medium and music," said Susan Demato, Art & Soul program coordinator.

Demato said the center asked the female artists to explore the role music plays in the creation of their art work and in their methods and work space.

"The results were charming and surprising," she said. "One artist, for example, who loves making pottery, said she's always moved by the pinging sound her pottery makes as the glazing dries and crazes. She thinks of it as the sound of her art work, which she calls her 'babies,' singing to her as they are born to the world."

A weaver and fiber artist, Demato said, is able to translate written music notation into patterns on her baskets and other woven art. Another artist, a creative photographer, is inspired by jazz music as she composes and processes her work.

Featured artists will include Carol Beck, Christy Brown, Liz Burns, Cookie Davis, Betty Francis, Diane Hamberg, Melissa Hawil, Lynette Holmes, Ellen Housel, Esme Lee, Casey Matthews, Nan Miller, Diane Paige, Suzanne Pickett, Linda Schultz, Trish Tipton, Raquel Tripp, Susan Wallace, Barbara Wroten and Sandra Volz.

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Music Is Central at Women's Art Show; Several Local Artists Will Be Featured
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