G8 Protester: Italian Police like Crazed Dogs; News in Brief

The Evening Standard (London, England), January 20, 2006 | Go to article overview

G8 Protester: Italian Police like Crazed Dogs; News in Brief


. A LONDONER allegedly beaten by police at the 2001 G8 summit in Genoa told a court in the city that they attacked him like "crazed dogs". Norman Blair, 38, from Hackney, said he was seriously hurt after being hit with batons and kicked as police raided a school building being used as the anti-globalisation protesters' base. Twenty-nine officers are charged with brutality and falsifying evidence. Mr Blair said: "We were all continually beaten, kicked and punched. We were hit repeatedly with truncheons."

Soul legend Wilson Pickett dies aged 64

. VETERAN soul singer Wilson Pickett, known for his hits Mustang Sally and In The Midnight Hour, has died of a heart attack in Virginia. He was 64.

Pickett, pictured, from Alabama, was famed for his trademark screams and flamboyant costumes. He was nicknamed "Wicked" Wilson Pickett by Jerry Wexler, cofounder of Atlantic Records, where he enjoyed his greatest success.

He had a string of hits in the Sixties and in 1991 enjoyed a career renaissance with the release of the film The Commitments. He released his last album, Grammy-nominated It's Harder Now, in 1999.

Olympic chiefs need to evict 42 more firms

. FORTY-TWO more businesses have been told they face eviction to make way for the 2012 Olympics. A total of 302 firms employing 6,058 staff will now lose their premises in Stratford because they are on land earmarked for the Games. The London Development Agency said the 42 latest companies to face eviction employ 180 people. …

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