Our Stations Must Be Made Safe

The Evening Standard (London, England), January 20, 2006 | Go to article overview

Our Stations Must Be Made Safe


TOM ap Rhys Pryce, the talented young solicitor brutally murdered last week, was followed from Kensal Green station, where a mugging had taken place on the platform shortly beforehand. The station is unmanned after 8.45pm.

Those travelling late at night, particularly women, urgently want to see a reassuring staff presence in the evening. Almost all Tube stations are staffed at night. However, those 14 or so Tube stations which are shared with and operated by mainline train companies are empty in mid to late evening.

Silverlink, the rail operator serving Kensal Green and most of the other Tube/rail stations, washed its hands of the problem in a statement this week.

The company blames "social issues" for crimes like the Rhys Pryce murder. Is Silverlink telling us it doesn't care if its customers are mugged, or worse?

Operators ONE and Southern also man Tube/rail stations only until 10pm at the latest.

There is an alternative: South Eastern is hiring "rail enforcement officers" to patrol trains. …

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