Judicial Misconduct Complaint against Alito Called a Stunt

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 21, 2006 | Go to article overview

Judicial Misconduct Complaint against Alito Called a Stunt


Byline: Charles Hurt, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

As part of a last-ditch effort to block the Supreme Court confirmation of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr., a Pennsylvania man accused the nominee of not fully disclosing complaints made against him in his Senate questionnaire.

H. Gerard Heimbecker filed a judicial misconduct complaint earlier this week saying Judge Alito did not disclose his efforts to have the entire Philadelphia-based U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit - including Judge Alito - recused from hearing his appeals.

"Judge Alito holds himself and fellow judges above the law and the complainant beneath the law," Mr. Heimbecker wrote.

Republicans on Capitol Hill rolled their eyes at news of the complaint and said it was a stunt engineered by Democrats frustrated over Judge Alito's apparently imminent confirmation next week. They said Mr. Heimbecker is known as a "serial litigator" in the 3rd Circuit.

"If this was orchestrated by the hard left in a desperate attempt to derail this nomination, they have failed miserably," said Don Stewart, spokesman for Sen. …

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Judicial Misconduct Complaint against Alito Called a Stunt
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