Pro-Life Groups See Brighter Days; Proposed Abortion Bans Offer Hope at 33rd Annual March for Life

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 23, 2006 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Pro-Life Groups See Brighter Days; Proposed Abortion Bans Offer Hope at 33rd Annual March for Life


Byline: Joyce Howard Price, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

As tens of thousands of abortion foes prepare for today's 33rd annual March for Life, they are buoyed by developments they see as promising for their cause, both at the state and federal levels.

"The pro-life movement is in the best position it has ever been in," said Wendy Wright, executive vice president of Concerned Women for America (CWA).

Pro-life advocates are excited about broad abortion bans proposed by lawmakers in two states, Ohio and Indiana.

It's their hope that these bills become law and that the statutes are eventually considered and upheld by a more conservative U.S. Supreme Court in a challenge to the Jan. 22, 1973, ruling in Roe v. Wade that abortion was a constitutional right.

"We're seeing, after many years of education and work, that people are beginning to understand the pro-life movement. The culture is shifting to a more pro-life perspective," said Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, which opposes abortion.

Miss Wright of CWA agrees. "The American public better understands what abortion has done to women and our country" by destroying innocent lives, she said.

The March for Life, sponsored by the March for Life Education and Defense Fund, is held annually in Washington, on or near the anniversary of the Roe v. Wade ruling. March leaders have estimated the number of protest marchers each of the past two years at 100,000.

As usual, this year's event begins with a noon rally. But unlike the past, it will not be held on the Ellipse near the White House. The staging area "will be on the Mall at Seventh Street," march organizer Nellie Gray said. After the rally, the crowd will march along Constitution Avenue, passing Congress and ending at the Supreme Court on First Street Northeast.

Pro-life advocates make it clear they are optimistic the Supreme Court will be more favorable to abortion restrictions, with the addition of Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and this week's expected confirmation of Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr.

Judge Alito said he would have "an open mind" about any challenge to Roe v. Wade, while previous nominees such as Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen G. Breyer have declared Roe fundamental law.

Vicki Saporta, president of the National Abortion Federation, said that Judge Alito "has not been confirmed yet" and that advocates for abortion rights are "still trying to defeat his nomination.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pro-Life Groups See Brighter Days; Proposed Abortion Bans Offer Hope at 33rd Annual March for Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.