Five Fruit and Veg a Day 'Could Save You from a Stroke'

Daily Mail (London), January 27, 2006 | Go to article overview

Five Fruit and Veg a Day 'Could Save You from a Stroke'


Byline: JENNY HOPE

Healthy taste: The regime could prevent up to 40,000 strokes TENS of thousands of lives could be saved and cases of severe disability prevented if people simply ate more fruit and vegetables, a major study has revealed.

Consuming more than five portions a day can reduce the risk of stroke by a staggering 26 per cent compared with an intake of less than three servings, the findings show.

On average, Britons eat three portions of fruit and veg a day.

More than 150,000 people suffer a stroke every year with an estimated 67,000 dying as a result, making it the third most common cause of death in the UK.

Many more are left paralysed or unable to speak.

A quarter of a million Britons live with a severe disability caused by stroke. The findings emerged from an analysis of eight studies involving more than 257,000 participants in Europe, the U.S. and Japan. A team led by Dr Feng He, from St George's, University of London, pooled data comparing fruit and vegetable consumption and stroke incidence.

The results, published in The Lancet medical journal, show a clear association between increased consumption of fruit and vegetables and reduced stroke risk.

The study found the biggest benefit in stroke reduction among those who ate more than five portions a day, but did not specify an upper limit. Dr He said: 'The average fruit and vegetable intake in most developed countries is about three servings per day, and current recommendations encourage five or more servings per day.

'Our results provide strong support for these recommendations. If these goals were achieved, stroke morbidity (illness) and mortality would be greatly reduced.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Five Fruit and Veg a Day 'Could Save You from a Stroke'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.