Electronic Mail Strategies for Environmental Health

By Hatfield, Thomas H. | Journal of Environmental Health, July-August 1993 | Go to article overview

Electronic Mail Strategies for Environmental Health


Hatfield, Thomas H., Journal of Environmental Health


On December 5 of 1992, I visited the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station. The most exciting part of my five-day trip was not the infamous Sarcophagus (formerly nuclear reactor #4), nor the radiation readings we took; nor the collaborative work proposed by the Ukrainian Scientific Center for Environmental Health. To be sure, these are personal and professional milestones, but one aspect stands out from the rest.

The trip was arranged by electronic mail ("e-mail").

Without the aid of any embassy, tour group or other special contacts, I coordinated my visit by direct communication with scientists in Kiev. The entire trip cost less than $600 U.S. I do not speak Russian or Ukrainian, and I did not know anyone from the former Soviet Union before my trip. I was fortunate to have as my traveling companion Dr. Auvo Reponen, a health physicist with the Finnish National Public Health Institute and an expert on Chernobyl fallout in Finland. However, Dr. Reponen had no special Ukrainian contacts, either.

We flew into Kiev without a visa.

When colleagues ask about this trip, my conversation inevitably turns to e-mail. I sometimes portray my adventure as a hunt for "big game," because the mundane entries that initiate computer e-mail belie the intriguing electronic chase that it really is. My story is intended to recruit more environmental health professionals to use this amazing tool. Therefore, the format of this article starts with questions about my trip to Chernobyl, but the answers are mostly about e-mail. The implications, I believe, are about the future of environmental health. I offer specific strategies for advancing our network.

* Without previous contacts, how could you communicate with Ukrainian scientists?

The key to such contacts is e-mail discussion groups, and various systems support such communication. The largest one is Internet (with free access at most universities) (1, 2). Compatible systems include FidoNet, and numerous strategies are emerging for connecting to Internet (3, 4). For example, general commercial systems connect to Internet such as Compuserve, Prodigy, MCI Mail and ATT Mail. Some systems such as PSI-link (phone: 1-518-283-8860) and Worldlink (phone: 1-703-709-5500) limit their services (and fees) to Internet connections. Other systems, such as EcoNet, focus on environmental issues (5). Individual choice of systems will vary with specific needs, but information is available in most computer stores or universities.

Without any contacts to the former Soviet Union, I obtained an Internet account at my university and took the following steps:

1) I sent e-mail to "ListServ @IndyCMS.IUPUI.EDU" with only the

f ollowing command in the first line of my message: List Global. (This command can be used at any address that begins with ListServ).

2) From the previous command, I received e-mail with a list of more than 3,000 discussion groups and instructions for subscribing to these groups (subscription is free). I used my word processing program to search for different keywords and found a discussion group called "Russia."

3) I sent e-mail to the same address ("ListServ @IndyCMS.IUPUI.EDU") with only the command: Sub Russia Tom Hatfield. This command means "subscription to Russia discussion group by Tom Hatfield." (This group was recently discontinued, the result of a never-ending evolution of discussion groups.)

4) After return e-mail confirmed my subscription, I sent e-mail to "Russia @IndyCMS.IUPUI.EDU" (the discussion group) asking for contacts in the former Soviet Union.

5) My request for contacts was automatically relayed to more than 300 members of that discussion group. Several members responded with Russian and Ukrainian e-mail addresses.

These simple acts speak volumes about the future of local environmental health agencies. E-mail encourages a global interdependence both within and outside our profession. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Electronic Mail Strategies for Environmental Health
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.