Knitters Pick Up Stitches as They Eye Olympic Glory

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), February 14, 2006 | Go to article overview

Knitters Pick Up Stitches as They Eye Olympic Glory


Byline: By SAM BURSON Western Mail

Sixteen days, thousands of knitters, one dream: to knit like the wind, to knit for glory, and knit for the gold, in the first ever Knitting Olympics. It may sound hard to believe, but this is the call to arms that has rallied 200 knitters to take up their needles and represent Wales.

The group, which consists of dedicated knitters across the country as well as many across the globe with connections to Wales, is taking part in the internet- inspired event involving more than 14 countries.

It is running in parallel to the Winter Olympic Games now taking place in and around Turin.

The teams are striving to create as many knitted garments, of the best quality possible, while the Olympic flame remains.

And while they may not have medals to display at the end of their efforts, showcasing knitting as an attractive pastime will be reward enough.

Competitors in the competition, which was created by an enthusiast from Canada, are challenged to knit an object which puts their skills to the test over the period of the Olympic Games.

All projects have to be completed before the flame is extinguished during the closing ceremony, after which they will be compared.

Despite being a keen knitter, co-captain of Team Wales Brenda Dayne, from Llanteg, Pembrokeshire, said she was inspired to take part in the event so she could help put Wales on the Olympic map.

Brenda, 45, was not initially impressed with the notion of a Knitting Olympics. …

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