It Is Muslims Who Have Been Most Let Down Here

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), February 14, 2006 | Go to article overview

It Is Muslims Who Have Been Most Let Down Here


Byline: By DENISE ROBERTSON Western Mail

There is only one phrase which fits the Abu Hamza story: you couldn't make it up. For seven years he has preached hate and incited savagery, all the while running rings round the rest of us, costing us in excess of pounds 4m and treating us with the contempt we probably deserve.

His family costs us pounds 1,000 a week in benefits, we have just given his half-million-pound council house a pounds 25,000 facelift, even though that council house was dishonestly obtained.

While living in it he owned another house, bought from the council and sold on by him for an astronomical sum. His profit was pounds 130,000 and yet we continued to keep him and his eight children as though they were paupers.

His legal aid bill is likely to top pounds 2m. This includes pounds 10,000 for a court session cancelled because Hamza said his toenails were too long for him to attend. Would you or I have got away with that excuse? So why did he?

I believe passionately in a united Britain, all races and creeds living as one, but something I saw enraged me. Militant Muslims were protesting, waving banners threatening death. A van driver remonstrated with them and was immediately pounced on by a policeman. The PC poked him aggressively in the chest, threatened to nick him, and told him repeatedly to shut up.

I can see the need to not aggravate a situation, but if we have one group allowed to say anything they like and another group barred from speaking at all, this will be manna from heaven to the BNP. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

It Is Muslims Who Have Been Most Let Down Here
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.