Welsh Nursery Songs

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), February 14, 2006 | Go to article overview

Welsh Nursery Songs


Byline: By RHODRI CLARK Western Mail

One of the great advantages of a bilingual upbringing is that it puts your feet in two cultural camps. The benefits start early. Parents who speak Welsh and English can pick the best from two treasure troves of nursery rhymes and songs to sing to their children. Your baby can giggle in delight at favourites like 'This little piggy went to market' and Humpty Dumpty. But they can also enjoy a big fall when you sing Gee Ceffyl Bach, the story of two children riding a horse which slips on the river-bed rocks. The kids dry their tears, forget the blood and ride the horse again, culminating in a leap over the moon and down to the lake. Most of the Welsh songs feature animals. When they're not farm animals or pets, they're wild ones such as jackdaws and robins. In one rhyme, a child is horrified that a friendly bird might fall from its lofty nest. Some English classics have been translated into Welsh. The hand movements for 'Incy Wincy spider' need no alteration for the Welsh version. However, most of the Welsh rhymes are not translations but verses sung to infants for centuries. They make for interesting comparisons.

Many of the English songs conform to the stereotype of English class distinction and wealth. A cat goes to London to see the queen. A child rides a horse to Banbury to see a fine lady with rings on her fingers, and a king calls for his fiddlers. Oranges and lemons is about defaulting on a debt.

The Welsh songs protect infants from financial worries. They convey an impression of a society that's happy in its toil and relative poverty. Dacw dadi'n mynd i'r ffair explains the farmer's life with beautiful innocence and not a trace of envy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Welsh Nursery Songs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.