Employee Involvement, Attitudes and Reactions to Technology Changes *

By Schraeder, Mike; Swamidass, Paul M. et al. | Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Spring 2006 | Go to article overview

Employee Involvement, Attitudes and Reactions to Technology Changes *


Schraeder, Mike, Swamidass, Paul M., Morrison, Rodger, Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies


This research examines the relationships between employee reactions to specific technological changes and the job-related attitudes of these employees. The specific changes include the transition, by the organization's clinical professionals, from the use of laptop computers to smaller palm-sized clinical assistant (CE) devices and the automation of clinical pathways into the computerized documentation system. Both technological changes were implemented with the intent of increasing the efficiency of the clinical professionals. Results of this longitudinal study indicated that individuals involved in making decisions related to the technology changes reacted more positively to the changes than individuals with low levels of involvement. Further, the results of this study revealed that individuals with higher pre-change levels of role ambiguity reacted more negatively to the technology changes.

Technological Change

The use of technology has grown at a phenomenal rate within organizations (Jick & Peiperl, 2003). Consequently, organizations continue to experience changes driven by technology (Hsieh & Tsai, 2005; Parsons, Liden, O'Connor,& Nagao, 1991). This trend is interesting given that research fails to reliably link technology adoption to improved organizational performance (Goodman & Rousseau, 2004).

Gaining insight into employee perspectives related to technology changes might strengthen the technology adoption-performance link. It is readily acknowledged that the implementation of technology is prompting modifications in organizational processes, tasks, and the nature of work (e.g., Dewett & Jones, 2001; Mirvis, Sales, & Hackett, 1991; Taylor, 2004). Quite often, technologically driven change has resulted in an increase in the number of individuals who use personal computers as a component of their jobs (Igbaria & Parasuraman, 1996; Nord & Nord, 1994; Sheng, Pearson, & Crosby, 2003). This infusion of technology has had a tremendous effect on employee morale, changing the nature of jobs, and impacting interactions with coworkers (Agarwal & Prasad, 1999; Mirvis et al., 1991; Reynolds, 2004; Thach & Woodman, 1994).

Researchers have studied (1) the effects of technology adoption on employee attitudes (e.g., Hebert & Benbasat, 1994; Owen & Demb, 2004; Rossetti & DeZoort, 1989); (2) ways that organizations can improve reactions to new technology (e.g., Venkatesh, 1999; Wicks, 2002); (3) the impact of technology on individuals and their job tasks (Bhattacherjee & Premkuman, 2004; Goodhue & Thompson, 1995); (4) how technology impacts individual job performance (Goodhue & Thompson, 1995; Kontoghiorghes, 2005); and (5) the potential impact of certain employee attitudes on the adoption of service related technology (Hebert & Benbasat, 1994; Tsikriktsis, Lanzolla, & Frohlich, 2004).

Findings related to the implementation of technological change suggest that the adoption of technology changes by individuals is largely based on their perceptions of how the technology will impact their jobs. Consequently, it appears that individuals who perceive that technology changes will improve their ability to perform their job tasks may be more willing to adopt the technology. In addition, findings suggest that technology changes impact employee attitudes (Griffin, 1991; Owen & Demb, 2004). The purpose of this study is to more closely examine the dynamic relationship between employee attitudes and reactions to new technology.

It is readily accepted that organizational change impacts employees in a variety of ways (French, Bell, & Zawacki, 2000). Consequently, the impact of organizational change on employee attitudes has received considerable research attention (e.g., Gardner, Dunham, Cummings, & Pierce, 1987; Griffin, 1997; Lines, 2004; Saari & Judge, 2004; Schweiger & DeNisi, 1991). Research indicates that employee attitudes are related to how individuals perceive or react to change (Mossholder, Settoon, Armenakis, & Harris, 2000). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Employee Involvement, Attitudes and Reactions to Technology Changes *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.