An Introduction to the Van Cliburn Foundation and the 2006 MTNA National Conference Artists

By Rodzinski, Richard | American Music Teacher, February-March 2006 | Go to article overview

An Introduction to the Van Cliburn Foundation and the 2006 MTNA National Conference Artists


Rodzinski, Richard, American Music Teacher


Personal cultivation begins with poetry, is strengthened by rules of decorum and is perfected by music.

--Confucius

Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, [light to the imagination, and life to everything.

--Plato

The Van Cliburn Foundation

From the birth of philosophy in the world's great cultures, music has been recognized as essential in shaping individuals and making them more sensitive, thus nurturing a humane citizenry.

It was with this understanding, as well as the wish to honor Van Cliburn, who embodies in every way the rewards that a life devoted to music-making at the highest levels of artistry can bring, that the Van Cliburn Foundation was created in 1960. Its mission statement reads:

"The Van Cliburn Foundation identifies and promotes the finest talent in classical music worldwide through piano competitions, concerts, and education programs." The Foundation fulfills this mission by conducting the quadrennial Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, widely considered to be the world's preeminent piano competition, and organizing the International Piano Competition for Outstanding Amateurs, the first of its kind in the United States. The Foundation also produces the annual Cliburn Concerts series, which brings world-renowned classical musicians to the Metroplex, as well as the Cliburn at the Modern series, designed to build audiences for new music. Finally, the Foundation offers interactive educational programs to benefit area students in cooperation with the Fort Worth Independent School District.

The Van Cliburn International Piano Competition

The Van Cliburn International Piano Competition is now regarded as the event that offers the most significant opportunities for aspiring musicians to be heard by audiences throughout the United States and abroad. Three stages of competition comprise the rigorous and comprehensive two-and-a-half week event. Following the preliminary round, during which the 30 pianists invited to Fort Worth each perform a recital, 12 semi-finalists collaborate with the Takacs Quartet, in addition to performing a second recital. Six finalists each perform two different concert with the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra, conducted by James Conlon, and play a third solo recital.

The most significant prizes bestowed by the Foundation are not the cash awards and medals. Instead, the Foundation offers its winners what they seek most: help launching their careers by means of three years of internationally managed concert tours, along with award-winning television documentaries, commercial recordings on the harmonia mundi label and an internationally syndicated 26-part radio series dedicated to the competition and its most memorable performances. By making the competition available in its entirety live on the Internet, streaming both audio and video, the Foundation has extended its outreach to listeners in every corner of the globe.

Stanislav Ioudeniteh: Master of Suspense

Of the hundreds of applications the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition receives seven months before each competition, approximately 140 pianists are selected to be scheduled in 40-minute public concerts in half-a-dozen cities throughout Europe and America. These concerts are attended by an unchanging five-member jury who are asked to select 30 pianists to invite to compete in Fort Worth.

For the 1997 competition, one of the sites was the Giuseppe Verdi Conservatory in Milan. We listened to a number of very fine pianists, several of whom came from the nearby town of Cadenabbia, where an American teacher, William Nabore, hosts a hand-picked number of extraordinary young pianists who are allowed to reside and practice in a beautiful villa on Lake Como, and who attend master classes presented by some of the music world's major luminaries. One cold January day during the Milan screenings, an unforgettable flurry took place back stage. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

An Introduction to the Van Cliburn Foundation and the 2006 MTNA National Conference Artists
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.