College Fair Offers Black Students Help, Hope

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 21, 2006 | Go to article overview

College Fair Offers Black Students Help, Hope


Byline: Adrienne T. Washington, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

On the way to the Alfred Street Baptist Church in Alexandria on Saturday morning, my nervous goddaughter, Jasmine, armed with a folder full of documents, said, "If I can just get one, it will make my day."

Well, six hours later, she did better than one and made my day as well.

"One" would have been a coveted "on-site" admission to a four-year college, but Jasmine, a senior at T.C. Williams High School, was granted immediate acceptance to two universities and received conditional admittance to two.

"It's a good feeling to be accepted face to face, on the spot," she said on the relaxed return trip.

Now, she knows she has educational options in her future. So many children don't.

Jasmine, 17, was one of about 250 students who were admitted to historically black colleges and universities as part of the growing annual Alfred Street Baptist Church College Festival, representing 40 historically black colleges and universities.

"This is a passion for me ... figuring out how [to organize the fair] and trying to get these children into school," said Vance F. Davis, who organized the college fair at the church starting six years ago.

Even better, about 50 students received scholarships ranging from $500 to $10,000 from Fisk, Grambling State, Tuskegee and Lincoln universities, and the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. Most schools waived admission fees for the estimated 700 participants.

"This was a great opportunity for students, and it was much easier than filling out the forms from the packets or online," said Jasmine, smiling.

Her relief came after navigating through the crowded rooms and corridors in the three-story church filled with colorful pennants and pompoms, slick literature, greeting tables lined with small gifts, an armful of applications and countless college recruiters, some dressed in their school sweatshirts and apparel.

What a welcome sight. Bad news about teens and young adults, especially struggling black students, abounds, so seeing so many who were obviously serious about their education was uplifting.

Some of the boys were in suits and the girls in heels; many carried portfolios and briefcases. The majority, like Jasmine, had parents, mentors, guardians or guidance counselors in tow.

Korey Jackson, 17, a student at Cardozo Senior High School in the District, said more students would have attended the fair had they known about it. A friend told him, and he was able to collect information and talk with recruiters even without all his necessary papers in hand. "I don't have to go around and find the information on my own," he said.

Several of his friends received acceptances, including Tina Marie Robinson, 17, a senior at Duke Ellington School for the Arts in the District.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

College Fair Offers Black Students Help, Hope
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.