The Defense Institute of Security Assistance Management Returns to Romania after Nine Years!

By Prince, Aaron M. | DISAM Journal, Fall 2005 | Go to article overview

The Defense Institute of Security Assistance Management Returns to Romania after Nine Years!


Prince, Aaron M., DISAM Journal


October 2005, the Defense Institute of Security Assistance Management (DISAM) successfully returned to Romania more than nine years after initially introducing United States Security Assistance Programs to the country's Ministry of National Defense in 1996.

DISAM, in cooperation with the Romanian Ministry of National Defense (RO MoND) and the U.S. Office of Defense Cooperation in Bucharest (ODC Bucharest), conducted several mobile education and training (MET) seminars. The classes focused on current U.S. policy and procedures of Security Cooperation Programs available to the RO MoND both in regards to procuring and sustaining U.S. defense articles as well as services. All of the DISAM MET events were held in Bucharest, the capital city of Romania.

Romania, with its strategic location and status as the largest, most populous country in its region, has been and continues to be a major contributor to stability in Southeast Europe and other parts of the world. Romania joined the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in the March of 2004 and has actively supported the United States and NATO through significant participation in the allied military presence in Bosnia and Kosovo, in Afghanistan as part of Operation Enduring Freedom, and in Iraq as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Working closely with the Romanian Ministry of National Defense, the Office of Defense Cooperation in Bucharest plays a major role in balancing and supporting the needs of the RO MoND while adhering to U.S. foreign policy objectives. Security cooperation activities within ODC Bucharest are designed to build upon an already extraordinary defense relationship between Romania and the United States. They are designed to develop high leverage Romanian military capabilities that are modern, professional, deployable and affordable as well as interoperable with U.S. forces and NATO forces. Furthermore, they are designed to provide U.S. forces with peacetime and contingency access as well as in route infrastructure. The ODC in Bucharest is also working to increase the scope of the training program by including more Expanded-International Military Education and Training (E-IMET) courses. As a result, this can lead to additional representatives being trained from all ministries involved in Romanian national defense thus helping to spur their reform and transformation process.

With the purpose of furthering these objectives, DISAM was invited by the Romanian Ministry of National Defense in coordination with ODC Bucharest to return to Romania with the goal of educating current executives and managers of RO MoND and its military in present day U.S. policies, procedures and programs available through various U.S. State Department Security Cooperation programs. Specific Security Cooperation programs to be addressed included Foreign Military Sales (FMS), Foreign Military Financing (FMF) and International Military Education and Training (IMET) programs. DISAM, eager to meet the challenge, simultaneously conducted three separate MET courses during a two week period. The courses were directed to Senior Foreign Purchaser Executives, Foreign Purchaser Managers and those involved with Training Management functions within the RO MoND. The knowledge exchanged between students and instructors during DISAM's stay in Romania proved to be extremely meaningful and well received by both sides.

The DISAM Romanian MET was lead by Ms. Virginia Caudill, Director of Management Studies at DISAM. Additional instructors from DISAM were Mr. Robert Hanseman, Mr. Frank Campanell, Mr. Donald McCormick and Mr. Aaron Prince. The team also was enhanced by the inclusion of Mr. Ronald Elliott from the Naval Education and Training Security Assistance Field Activity (NETSAFA).

The first week of training consisted of two DISAM courses which ran consecutively; the Security Assistance Management Executive Foreign Purchaser Planning and Resource Management course (SAM-FE) as well as the Security Assistance Management Foreign Purchaser Planning and Resource Management course (SAM-F). …

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