Career Concepts Thrives despite Job Search Web Sites

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 23, 2006 | Go to article overview

Career Concepts Thrives despite Job Search Web Sites


Byline: Kelli Gavant Medill News Service

Business profile

Name: Career Concepts USA Inc.

Business: job fairs

Location: Cary

Owner, president: Bob Cramer

Employees: 26

2005 revenue: $4 million

Web site: www.careerconceptsusa.com

The Internet revolutionized the job search and hiring process, giving job seekers and employers greater access to each other.

Yet it has not simplified the process for either side of the hiring process, said Bob Cramer, president and owner of Career Concepts USA Inc.

"What's happened is the Internet has been a great tool for all of us for recruiting, but it's also made our society very lazy in our job search," Cramer said.

Career Concepts USA, a 25-year-old, Cary-based company, stages job fairs nationwide and markets itself as the Internet's missing link. It brings job hunters and hiring companies together in a way that matches the needs of both sides.

Despite Cramer's reservations about Internet job sites, Career Concepts uses sites like Monster.com to advertise. This generates a better cross section of potential candidates for companies to meet face-to-face instead of a stack of resumes to decipher.

Yet some people, such as Dustin Etheredge of Oak Brook, have success using the Internet as a job search tool.

"I have two interviews today, one for tomorrow and one for Monday," he said recently. "Of those four, two of them found me online."

Yet companies that advertise on the Internet can be flooded with resumes.

"You get a larger pool of candidates, but it takes a lot more time to filter through to find the top-quality candidate," said Brad Kallevig, a recruiter with Bloomington-based Country Insurance and Financial Services Inc.

Career Concepts does nearly 300 job fairs a year in more than 65 major metropolitan markets. The current growth is a remarkable turnaround for a business that almost shut its doors in 1990.

Struggling in debt, Cramer let go of all of his employees and nearly declared bankruptcy. Yet with a resolve that Cramer, now 53, credits to his faith, he gradually rebuilt the company.

For about seven years, all of his efforts went toward paying off about $500,000 in debt.

In the late 1990s, the business started to grow again. By this time, Cramer's competition had shifted to doing job fairs for the technology industry. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Career Concepts Thrives despite Job Search Web Sites
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.