Teacher-Librarians Supporting Student Learning

By Rosenfeld, Esther | Teacher Librarian, February 2006 | Go to article overview
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Teacher-Librarians Supporting Student Learning


Rosenfeld, Esther, Teacher Librarian


Read on to learn about new resources that support teacher-librarians' efforts as literacy advocates.

Be the Change is a new global citizenship curriculum initiative of the Ontario School Library Association. In February 2005 at the Ontario Library Association Super Conference, Craig Kielburger (founder of Free the Children) and Stephen Lewis (United Nations Special Envoy on HIV and AIDS in Africa) presented passionate keynote speeches describing the plight of children in Africa. Be the Change is inspired by the work of Kielburger and Lewis and has adopted the words of Mahatma Gandhi as its vision: "You must be the change you want to see in the world." Its purpose is to educate students about their responsibility in protecting the human rights of all people and to enforce the notion that every individual can make a difference in this world. The curriculum consists of a series of flexible and adaptable lessons and units for students in grades K-12, organized around the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and linked to curriculum standards and information literacy standards. The lessons are based on picture books for all grade levels, novels, nonfiction materials, and electronic resources. Because the focus is on promoting active global citizenship, each lesson includes suggestions for action. A comprehensive annotated resource list accompanies the curriculum, which is available at www.accessola.com/osla/bethechange.

Me Read? No Way: A Practical Guide to Improving Boys' Literacy Skills, recently published by the Ontario Ministry of Education, was prepared as part of a major initiative to improve student literacy. The document, intended as a guide for teachers, is based on an international review of effective strategies and practices used in successful literacy programs for boys. The guide is organized around 13 "Strategies for Success" chapters, each of which summarizes the most important research on how boys develop literacy skills and what strategies are the most effective to help boys succeed. Many of the "Strategies for Success" chapters stress the role of the school library and the teacher-librarian as part of the school's literacy team.

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Teacher-Librarians Supporting Student Learning
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