Immigration Solutions; Immigration Consequences of Criminal Convictions

Manila Bulletin, February 26, 2006 | Go to article overview

Immigration Solutions; Immigration Consequences of Criminal Convictions


Byline: Robert Reeves

Criminal convictions can have severe immigration consequences. However, an individual facing a criminal conviction may avoid some of the harsh consequences by having his/her criminal attorney consult with an experienced immigration attorney. It is important for the immigration attorney to analyze the criminal case because the defense strategy for a legal permanent resident will be different for each case. The analysis changes depending upon past convictions and what type of immigration relief is potentially available.

An immigration expert will be able to identify whether a certain offense will simply delay a grant of naturalization to US citizenship or obtain legal permanent resident status; or worse yet, trigger removal (deportation) proceedings. For example, individuals with aggravated felony convictions may not be eligible for any relief and may be ordered removed from the United States. Aggravated felonies refers to those felonies which require a sentence of 365 days or more. Certain misdemeanor offenses with a sentence of 365 days may constitute an aggravated felony. These offenses include but are not limited to crimes of violence, theft, receipt of stolen property, obstruction of justice, perjury and subordination of perjury. However, some aggravated felony convictions can be avoided if a sentence of 364 days or less is imposed. There are some offenses which will be classified as aggravated felonies regardless of the sentence imposed. Such offenses include, but are not limited to, offenses relating to drug trafficking, firearms, sexual abuse of a minor or rape. Persons arrested or convicted of any of the offenses must consult with an experienced immigration attorney.

Both statutory and case law is constantly changing and an alien convicted of a criminal offense may still have relief available. For instance, the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) recently held in In re Adamiak that a conviction vacated for failure of the trial court to advise the defendant of the possible immigration consequences of a guilty plea is no longer a valid conviction for immigration purposes. …

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Immigration Solutions; Immigration Consequences of Criminal Convictions
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