Queen of Hip-Hop Literature: Renaissance Publisher Is Sparking Interest with Her Line of Urban Novels

By El-Amin, Zakiyyah | Black Enterprise, January 2006 | Go to article overview

Queen of Hip-Hop Literature: Renaissance Publisher Is Sparking Interest with Her Line of Urban Novels


El-Amin, Zakiyyah, Black Enterprise


A new genre of fiction novels called hip-hop literature has exploded onto best-seller lists and become an unexpected cash cow for writers and publishing houses alike. As an author and owner of Triple Crown Publications L.L.C., Vickie Stringer has established herself as a maverick in this field by creating an enterprise selling books about life on the streets.

After serving a seven-year prison sentence for drug trafficking and moneylaundering, Stringer started a new life with no formal job training or a college degree. While behind bars, she penned a manuscript, Let That Be the Reason, based upon her experiences in the drug trade. "I no longer wanted to live the same way I did in the past, so I wrote this story as a way to discourage others from also turning to the streets," says Stringer.

Twenty-six publishing houses rejected Stringer's manuscript before she decided to publish it herself. She sent out 25 letters to family and friends requesting a donation of $100 each. This capital enabled her to print 1,500 copies of the book in 2001. She sold her debut novel for $10 at beauty salons, car washes, and out of the trunk of her car.

It was not long before Stringer was an underground success and aspiring authors approached her to publish their manuscripts. The 30-something entrepreneur now had the opportunity to tap into a market that, until recently, had been overlooked by major publishing houses.

Despite the growing appeal of hip-hop literature, Stringer's books have created a bit of controversy. Many complain about the explicit portrayal of sex, profanity, and violence, while others argue that the books glorify the "thug" life. …

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