Immigration Reform Debate Heats Up in Nation's Capital

By McGee, Jennifer | Nation's Cities Weekly, February 20, 2006 | Go to article overview

Immigration Reform Debate Heats Up in Nation's Capital


McGee, Jennifer, Nation's Cities Weekly


Comprehensive immigration reform is a top legislative priority for both Congress and the Bush Administration in 2006.

NLC has also named immigration reform as one of three top advocacy priorities for 2006 along with the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program and telecommunications reform.

Approximately 11 million undocumented workers are currently residing in the United States. The increasing presence of the undocumented population is stimulating a vigorous debate among public officials at all levels of government.

In December, the House of Representatives passed the The Border Protection, Antiterrorism, and Illegal Immigration Control Act (H.R. 4437) sponsored by Reps, James Sensenbrenner (R-Wis.) and Peter King (R-N.Y.). H.R. 4437 is intended to aggressively reform immigration with a focus on border security and does not address reform in a comprehensive manner.

Several provisions in this bill violate the principals of federalism and place burdensome unfunded federal mandates on local governments.

Section 220 gives state and local police officers the authority to enforce federal immigration laws. NLC opposes this provision as it is an outright preemption of local laws. Such a mandate would divert local law enforcement personnel from their primary duty to protect the general public and would threaten the police department's relationships in the immigrant community.

Also troubling to cities is a provision that would block federal law enforcement funds from going to local governments that have enacted laws that expressly prohibit local law enforcement officers from informing the federal government of known illegal immigrants.

The funds in question are from the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP), a federal program that reimburses local governments for detaining criminal aliens. SCAAP is not a grant program, it is a reimbursement program. Presently, the federal government is reimbursing state and local agencies three-cents on the dollar of their SCAAP costs.

Earlier this month President Bush eliminated SCAAP funding in his FY 2007 budget proposal. At about the same time, the President signed into law the reauthorization of the Violence against Women Act (VAWA) which included the reauthorization of SCAAP at $850 million for FY 2007. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Immigration Reform Debate Heats Up in Nation's Capital
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.