Advancing on the Pro-Life Front: Pro-Life Marches on the 33rd Anniversary of Roe V. Wade Underscore the Momentum Shift That Has Taken Place against Abortion

By Jasper, William F. | The New American, February 20, 2006 | Go to article overview

Advancing on the Pro-Life Front: Pro-Life Marches on the 33rd Anniversary of Roe V. Wade Underscore the Momentum Shift That Has Taken Place against Abortion


Jasper, William F., The New American


Hundreds of thousands of pro-life advocates turned out for marches and rallies throughout the country to mark the 33rd anniversary of the infamous Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that struck down virtually all state restrictions on abortion. More than 100,000 pro-life demonstrators converged on Washington, D.C., on Monday, January 23, for the annual March for Life. Two days earlier, on Saturday, January 21, the second annual West Coast Walk for Life in San Francisco drew more than 15,000 supporters, doubling attendance from the previous year. Tens of thousands more turned out for similar right-to-life events in state capitals and major cities from coast to coast, demanding an end to the holocaust that has taken the lives of more than 47 million unborn babies since the 1973 ruling.

In the nation's capital, the March for Life began at the National Mall and ended at the Supreme Court building, highlighting the current battle in the U.S. Senate over the nomination of Judge Samuel Alito to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. The theme of the 33rd annual March for Life was: "Roe v. Wade Violates the American Way." And pro-life leaders let it be known that reversing the Roe decision remains a primary goal.

"The State or a person," said Nellie Gray, president and original organizer of the March for Life, "can never justify the intentional killing of an innocent born or pre-born human in existence at fertilization. No Exception! No Compromise! We are calling for Americans to unify on goals and strategies to overturn Roe v. Wade, and replace it with the life principles." "We expect every Supreme Court justice to overturn Roe versus Wade. We expect them to do the right thing," Gray told marchers in Washington, D.C.

President Bush--who was in Manhattan, Kansas, for a speech--lent his support to the March for Life rally, saying, "You believe, as I do, that every human life has value, that the strong have a duty to protect the weak, and that the self-evident truths of the Declaration of Independence apply to everyone, not just to those considered healthy or wanted or convenient." He added, "These principles call us to defend ... all who are weak and vulnerable, especially unborn children."

The youthfulness of the pro-life movement was evident at Roe v. Wade anniversary rallies across the country, but was especially pronounced at the national March for Life, where tens of thousands of high school and college students came by bus, train, car, and plane to stand up for life and oppose the culture of death. A Youth Mass celebrated by Cardinal Theodore McCarrick at Washington, D.C.'s MCI Center before the march was filled to capacity with 22,000 young people. Another 2,000 were reportedly turned away because the facility was already overcrowded.

Rep. Chris Smith (R-N.J.), like others addressing the March for Life, noted the overwhelming prevalence of youth in the crowd and urged the young people to increase their efforts against abortion. "As I look out at the tens of thousands of young people at this march, a source of inspiration and hope, I can't help but to offer an invitation, a challenge, a plea, for you to absolutely redouble your prayers, fasting and work on behalf of those at risk, both mothers and babies," Smith said. The congressman quoted Matthew 25, referring to Jesus' admonition about "Whatsoever you do to the least of these you do unto me."

Remembering Terri

Euthanasia took center stage alongside abortion this year, pushed to the fore by the court-ordered dehydration killing of Terri Schindler Schiavo. Terri Schiavo's brother Bobby Schindler addressed the national March for Life, pledging that the foundation the family established in her name would bring the fight against euthanasia to public prominence.

"We lost Terri, but this does not mean God did not hear your prayers," said Schindler. "Your prayers sustained our family, and we are here today to tell you that we are going forward to fight against care rationing, euthanasia, and medical killing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Advancing on the Pro-Life Front: Pro-Life Marches on the 33rd Anniversary of Roe V. Wade Underscore the Momentum Shift That Has Taken Place against Abortion
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.